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Tim Wu's The master switch : the rise and fall of information empires

Author: Barbara Van Schewick; Tim Wu; Stanford University. Center for Internet & Society,; Stanford Law and Technology Association,; Stanford University. School of Law.
Publisher: [Stanford, California] : Stanford Law School, [2011]
Edition/Format:   DVD video : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Wu shows that each of the new media of the twentieth century- radio, telephone, television, and film- was born free and open. Each invited unrestricted use and enterprising experiment until some would-be mogul battled his way to total domination. Explaining how invention begets industry and industry begets empire- a progress often blessed by government, typically with stifling consequences for free expression and  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Barbara Van Schewick; Tim Wu; Stanford University. Center for Internet & Society,; Stanford Law and Technology Association,; Stanford University. School of Law.
OCLC Number: 746779291
Notes: Sponsored by the Center for Internet and Society and the Stanford Law and Technology Association.
Presented May 9, 2011.
Performer(s): Introduction by Barbara van Schewick; Tim Wu, presenter.
Description: 1 videodisc (1 hr., 8 min.) : sound, color ; 4 3/4 in.
Details: DVD video.
Responsibility: CIS/SLATA present ; featuring Tim Wu.

Abstract:

Wu shows that each of the new media of the twentieth century- radio, telephone, television, and film- was born free and open. Each invited unrestricted use and enterprising experiment until some would-be mogul battled his way to total domination. Explaining how invention begets industry and industry begets empire- a progress often blessed by government, typically with stifling consequences for free expression and technical innovation alike- Wu identifies a time-honored pattern in the maneuvers of today's great information powers.

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