skip to content
To be an author : letters of Charles W. Chesnutt, 1889-1905 Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

To be an author : letters of Charles W. Chesnutt, 1889-1905

Author: Charles W Chesnutt; Joseph R McElrath; Robert C Leitz
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Princeton University Press, ©1997.
Edition/Format:   Print book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Long eclipsed by the writers who later rose to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance, Charles W. Chesnutt (1858-1932) has received a steadily increasing amount of attention since the 1960s. In what he termed the "Post-Bellum-Pre-Harlem" phase of African-American cultural history, this pioneer in the world of black letters vied with Paul Laurence Dunbar for the honor of being the first to "evince innate
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Records and correspondence
Correspondence
Named Person: Charles W Chesnutt; Charles Waddell Chesnutt; Charles W Chesnutt; Charles Waddell Chesnutt; Charles Waddell Chesnutt
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Charles W Chesnutt; Joseph R McElrath; Robert C Leitz
ISBN: 0691036683 9780691036687
OCLC Number: 35084581
Description: xv, 248 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Cable's Protege in 1889-1891: An "Insider" Views the Negro Question --
A Dream Deferred, 1891-1896: The Businessman Prevails --
Page's Protege in 1897-1899: The Reemergence of the Artist and Prophet --
The Professional Novelist of 1899-1902: Pursuit of the Dream --
Discontent in 1903-1904: A Turn to Argumentative Prose --
The Quest Renewed, 1904-1905: Argumentative Art for an Indifferent Readership.
Responsibility: edited by Joseph R. McElrath, Jr. and Robert C. Leitz III.
More information:

Abstract:

Collected in this volume are the 1889-1905 letters of one of the first African-American literary artists to cross the "color line" into the de facto segregated publishing industry of the turn of the  Read more...

Reviews

Editorial reviews

Publisher Synopsis

"A thoughtful and energetic reader, Mizruchi produces some fine insights, particularly about the novels' production of complicity between their narrators and seemingly non-authorial characters and Read more...

 
User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/35084581>
library:oclcnum"35084581"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
rdf:typeschema:MediaObject
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/799698>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Écrivains noirs américains--20e siècle--Correspondance."@en
schema:about
<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/799279>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Écrivains noirs américains--19e siècle--Correspondance."@en
schema:about
schema:about
<http://viaf.org/viaf/22198527>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"1858"
schema:birthDate"(1858"
schema:deathDate"1932)"
schema:deathDate"1932"
schema:familyName"Chesnutt"
schema:givenName"Charles Waddell"
schema:givenName"Charles W."
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles Waddell, (1858-1932)"
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles Waddell, 1858-1932"
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles Waddell."
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles W. (Charles Waddell), 1858-1932"
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles W. (Charles Waddell), 1858-1932."
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:contributor
schema:contributor
schema:copyrightYear"1997"
schema:creator
<http://viaf.org/viaf/22198527>
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:birthDate"1858"
schema:birthDate"(1858"
schema:deathDate"1932)"
schema:deathDate"1932"
schema:familyName"Chesnutt"
schema:givenName"Charles Waddell"
schema:givenName"Charles W."
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles Waddell, (1858-1932)"
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles Waddell, 1858-1932"
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles Waddell."
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles W. (Charles Waddell), 1858-1932"
schema:name"Chesnutt, Charles W. (Charles Waddell), 1858-1932."
schema:datePublished"1997"
schema:description"His other books, Frederick Douglass (1899), The House Behind the Cedars (1900), The Marrow of Tradition (1901), and The Colonel's Dream (1905), have since secured his permanent place in the history of American belles lettres."@en
schema:description"To his mind he had reached the goal of transcending the earlier achievements of reform-novelists Harriet Beecher Stowe and Albion W. Tourgee. But such fame as Booker T. Washington's at the turn of the century eluded him. By late 1905, it was clear that his 1880s' dream of professional authorship was not to be realized in full. Chronicled here is the rise and fall of Charles W. Chesnutt as a man of letters."@en
schema:description"Selected for inclusion in this first edition of Chesnutt's letters are those that best document the vibrant personality of a very successful Cleveland businessman who gave his free hours to the literary avocation that he had hoped would someday become his full-time career. Motivated as well by a desire to continue the noble work that the Abolitionists and Reconstruction Era reformers had begun, Chesnutt pursued the goal that he had announced in his journal years earlier in Fayetteville, N.C., before he emigrated to the North in 1883: he would not only demonstrate what African Americans were capable of intellectually but would, through his art, "elevate the whites" above ignoble prejudice against those of his racial background. By 1905 he had both succeeded and failed."@en
schema:description"Long eclipsed by the writers who later rose to prominence during the Harlem Renaissance, Charles W. Chesnutt (1858-1932) has received a steadily increasing amount of attention since the 1960s. In what he termed the "Post-Bellum-Pre-Harlem" phase of African-American cultural history, this pioneer in the world of black letters vied with Paul Laurence Dunbar for the honor of being the first to "evince innate distinction in literature." The major establishment critic of his day, William Dean Howells, recognized Dunbar's poetry thus in 1896. But it was Chesnutt who won Howells's praise for prose fiction a few years later when The Conjure Woman (1899) and The Wife of His Youth (1899) appeared."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/836991161>
schema:genre"Records and correspondence"@en
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"To be an author : letters of Charles W. Chesnutt, 1889-1905"@en
schema:publication
schema:publisher
schema:workExample
umbel:isLike<http://bnb.data.bl.uk/id/resource/GB9843523>
wdrs:describedby

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.