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To intermix with our white brothers : Indian mixed bloods in the United States from earliest times to the Indian removals

Author: Thomas N Ingersoll
Publisher: Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, ©2005.
Edition/Format:   Print book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In this study, Thomas Ingersoll argues the Jacksonian American Indian removal policy appealed to popular racial prejudice against all Indians, including special suspicion of mixed bloods. Lawmakers also perceived a threat to white Americans' transatlantic reputation posed by the potential for general racial mixture, or "amalgamation." Beginning in the 1780s, and for the ensuing half-century, alarmed government
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Genre/Form: History
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas N Ingersoll
ISBN: 0826332870 9780826332875
OCLC Number: 60373661
Description: xxi, 450 pages ; 23 cm
Contents: Introduction: John or Teyoninhokarawen? --
Policies to limit race mixture in early North America from earliest times to 1776 --
Becoming sons and daughters of the forest : racial mixture in the American colonies and revolutionary states from earliest times to the 1830s --
"Dark-eyed Houris of the Metiff blood" : mixed bloods as "halfbreed" outcasts --
Mixed bloods and a "middle ground" of acculturation --
Mixed bloods and the rise of racial formalism : from Jefferson to Jackson --
Defenders of the homeland and racial pluralists, or, "A pascle of designing speculating individuals?" : mixed-blood leaders, racial formalism, and federal removal policy --
Epilogue: Mixed bloods after the era of the removals.
Responsibility: Thomas N. Ingersoll.
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Abstract:

"In this study, Thomas Ingersoll argues the Jacksonian American Indian removal policy appealed to popular racial prejudice against all Indians, including special suspicion of mixed bloods. Lawmakers also perceived a threat to white Americans' transatlantic reputation posed by the potential for general racial mixture, or "amalgamation." Beginning in the 1780s, and for the ensuing half-century, alarmed government officials attempted to separate full blood and mixed-blood Indians into enclaves in the Far West, to isolate them from white migrants out of the eastern states and prevent the rise of a new, genuinely alternative mixed society.".

"Ingersoll begins by examining the origins and early history of mixed bloods in North America. He follows with the lives of individual mixed bloods, an exploration of how the growing mixed population informed racial thought in the Early National Period, and the role of mixed-blood chiefs in opposing the Indian Removal Act of 1830."--BOOK JACKET.

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