skip to content
To light such a candle : chapters in the history of science and technology Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

To light such a candle : chapters in the history of science and technology

Author: Keith J Laidler
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1998.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In To Light Such a Candle, renowned chemist and science historian Keith Laidler examines the progress of science and technology over the centuries, tracing the often separate paths of these pursuits, showing how they have ultimately worked together to transform everyday life. Faraday's pure research on electricity, for example, had immense technological implications, while Maxwell's theory of electromagnetic  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Biography
History
Biographies
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Laidler, Keith J. (Keith James), 1916-2003.
To light such a candle.
Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 1998
(OCoLC)605490798
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Keith J Laidler
ISBN: 0198500564 9780198500568
OCLC Number: 37132510
Description: xii, 384 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Science and technology --
James Watt and the science of thermodynamics --
Daguerre, Talbot, and the legacy of photography --
Michael Faraday and electric power --
James Clark Maxwell and radio transmission --
J. J. Thomson and the electronic age --
The Braggs and molecular architecture --
Planck, Einstein, the quantum theory, and relativity --
Scientists, science, and society.
Responsibility: by Keith J. Laidler.
More information:

Abstract:

In To Light Such a Candle, renowned chemist and science historian Keith Laidler examines the progress of science and technology over the centuries, tracing the often separate paths of these pursuits, showing how they have ultimately worked together to transform everyday life. Faraday's pure research on electricity, for example, had immense technological implications, while Maxwell's theory of electromagnetic radiation led directly to the discovery of radio transmission, something of which Maxwell himself had no conception. Conversely, the early steam engines were by no means science-based, but they led directly to the science of thermodynamics, one of the most fundamental branches of pure science. Illuminated by many fascinating stories from the history of science, this book provides a powerful argument for the relevance of pure research, and gives the general reader and scientist alike an idea of the nature and importance of the links between science and technology.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/37132510>
library:oclcnum"37132510"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/37132510>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1998"
schema:description"In To Light Such a Candle, renowned chemist and science historian Keith Laidler examines the progress of science and technology over the centuries, tracing the often separate paths of these pursuits, showing how they have ultimately worked together to transform everyday life. Faraday's pure research on electricity, for example, had immense technological implications, while Maxwell's theory of electromagnetic radiation led directly to the discovery of radio transmission, something of which Maxwell himself had no conception. Conversely, the early steam engines were by no means science-based, but they led directly to the science of thermodynamics, one of the most fundamental branches of pure science. Illuminated by many fascinating stories from the history of science, this book provides a powerful argument for the relevance of pure research, and gives the general reader and scientist alike an idea of the nature and importance of the links between science and technology."@en
schema:description"Science and technology -- James Watt and the science of thermodynamics -- Daguerre, Talbot, and the legacy of photography -- Michael Faraday and electric power -- James Clark Maxwell and radio transmission -- J. J. Thomson and the electronic age -- The Braggs and molecular architecture -- Planck, Einstein, the quantum theory, and relativity -- Scientists, science, and society."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/203154283>
schema:genre"Biography"@en
schema:genre"Biography."@en
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:genre"History."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"To light such a candle : chapters in the history of science and technology"@en
schema:numberOfPages"384"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.