skip to content
Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

"Tools and the man" : Samuel Smiles, lives of the engineers, and the machine in Victorian literature

Author: Courtney Salvey; Stephen Prickett; Baylor University. Department of English.
Publisher: Waco, Tex. : Baylor University, 2009.
Dissertation: Thesis (M.A.)--Baylor University, 2009.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : eBook   Computer File : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
While Victorian responses to the machine varied greatly, a distinct literary strain emerged with Carlyle and ran through Ruskin and Dickens which understood the machine as a threat to human agency. In their fear, they focused on machinery itself as sublime or horrible. Samuel Smiles' series of engineering biographies, entitled Lives of the Engineers, argues against this position by highlighting the engineer, the  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: Samuel Smiles; Samuel Smiles
Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Courtney Salvey; Stephen Prickett; Baylor University. Department of English.
OCLC Number: 694791350
Description: v, 87 pages 197892 bytes 565182 bytes
Details: Mode of access: World Wide Web.; System requirements: PDF files require Adobe Acrobat Reader.
Responsibility: by Courtney Salvey.

Abstract:

While Victorian responses to the machine varied greatly, a distinct literary strain emerged with Carlyle and ran through Ruskin and Dickens which understood the machine as a threat to human agency. In their fear, they focused on machinery itself as sublime or horrible. Samuel Smiles' series of engineering biographies, entitled Lives of the Engineers, argues against this position by highlighting the engineer, the human element, who creates and controls the machine. Interacting with concepts from Carlyle, Smiles' biographies show engineers as Captains of Industry, dynamic men who shape themselves and lead others. By combining a narrative of these self-made men with a narrative of technological history, Smiles shows that machines are products of human agency rather than threats to it. This presentation facilitates the inclusion of engineers in subsequent works by Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Kingsley, George Eliot, and Rudyard Kipling.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/694791350>
library:oclcnum"694791350"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/694791350>
rdf:typej.2:Thesis
rdf:typej.2:Web_document
rdf:typej.0:Thesis
rdfs:seeAlso
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
rdf:typeschema:Person
schema:name"Smiles, Samuel, 1812-1904"
schema:about
schema:author
schema:contributor
rdf:typeschema:Organization
schema:name"Baylor University. Department of English."
schema:contributor
schema:datePublished"2009"
schema:description"While Victorian responses to the machine varied greatly, a distinct literary strain emerged with Carlyle and ran through Ruskin and Dickens which understood the machine as a threat to human agency. In their fear, they focused on machinery itself as sublime or horrible. Samuel Smiles' series of engineering biographies, entitled Lives of the Engineers, argues against this position by highlighting the engineer, the human element, who creates and controls the machine. Interacting with concepts from Carlyle, Smiles' biographies show engineers as Captains of Industry, dynamic men who shape themselves and lead others. By combining a narrative of these self-made men with a narrative of technological history, Smiles shows that machines are products of human agency rather than threats to it. This presentation facilitates the inclusion of engineers in subsequent works by Elizabeth Gaskell, Charles Kingsley, George Eliot, and Rudyard Kipling."
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/767549325>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name""Tools and the man" Samuel Smiles, lives of the engineers, and the machine in Victorian literature"
schema:publisher
schema:url<http://hdl.handle.net/2104/5421>

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.