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Torture and democracy

Author: Darius M Rejali
Publisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, ©2007.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This is the most comprehensive, and most comprehensively chilling, study of modern torture yet written. Darius Rejali, one of the world's leading experts on torture, takes the reader from the late nineteenth century to the aftermath of Abu Ghraib, from slavery and the electric chair to electro-torture in American inner cities, and from French and British colonial prison cells and the Spanish-American War to the  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Darius M Rejali
ISBN: 9780691114224 0691114226 9780691143330 0691143331
OCLC Number: 123485118
Awards: Winner of American Political Science Association: Human Rights Award 2008.
Description: xxiii, 849 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: Introduction --
Historical claims --
Puzzles and cautions --
The priority of public monitoring --
Variations among states --
Variations within states --
National styles of stealth torture --
torture and democracy --
Does torture work? --
Who cares? I. Torture and democracy --
1. Modern torture and its observers --
Defining torture --
Monitoring torture --
2. Torture and democracy --
The National Security Model --
The Juridical Model --
The Civic Discipline Model --
Hell is in the details. II. Remembering Stalinism and Nazism --
Introduction --
3. Lights, heat, and sweat --
Sweating and stealth in America --
British psychological techniques --
Interrogation elsewhere in Europe --
Sweating and stealth in Russia --
The spread of the Russian style --
Remembering Pavlov --
4. Whips and water --
LaBussière's list --
Documenting Nazi torture --
Torture in Germany --
Torture in Nazi-occupied Europe --
Remembering the War --
5. Bathtubs --
Masuy's bathtub --
Marty's magneto --
The French Gestapo and electric torture --
The decline of sweating and stealth --
The German Gestapo and modern torture --
Remembering Nuremberg --
The search for electric torture. III. A history of electric stealth --
6. Shock --
The AC/DC controversy and the electric chair --
The mystery of electric death --
Early police devices --
The mystery of shock --
Early medical devices --
Transmitting shock --
Later medical devices --
Remembering the animals --
7. Magnetos --
What is a magneto? --
Indochina --
Out of Indochina --
Korea --
Out of Korea --
The lost history of the magneto --
French and British electrotorture after World War II --
The Colonial police and Wuillaume's list --
the triumph of the Gégène --
Algeria --
Remembering the Gestapo --
8. Currents --
South Vietnamese torture --
Vietnam --
Bell Telephone Hour --
Out of Vietnam again --
Variation within the French style --
Cattle prods --
The electric cornucopia --
Remembering Vietnam --
9. Singing the world electric --
When electrotorture was new --
Explaining clean electrotorture --
Crafting electrotorture --
Surging forward --
The Americas --
Middle East and North Africa --
Asia --
Sub-Saharan Africa --
Europe and Central Asia --
Explaining the surge --
Remembering the Cold War --
10. Prods, tasers, and stun guns --
Electric utopia --
Electric-free protest --
Stun technology --
Covering America --
Remembering Eutopia --
Stun city --
Magneto torture in Chicago --
Stun and torture --
Tasers and torture --
Burning issues --
Stun and democracy --
But no one died --
Civic shock --
Welcome to Stun City. IV. Other stealth traditions --
Introduction --
12. Sticks and bones --
Clean whipping --
Paddles --
Beating feet --
Remembering slaves and sailors --
13. Water, sleep, and spice --
Pumping --
Choking --
Showers and ice --
Salt and spice --
Deprivation of sleep --
Remembering the Inquisition --
14. Stress and duress --
Great and lesser stress traditions --
British stress tortures --
French stress tortures --
American stress tortures --
Authoritarian adaptations --
Remembering the Eighteenth Century --
15. Forced standing and other positions --
Old user after the War --
Positional tortures in the Communist world --
Positional tortures in the non-Communist world --
The universal distributor hypothesis revisited --
Remembering the Hooded Men --
Fists and exercises --
Clean beating --
Adapting "the necktie" --
Exhaustion exercises --
Remembering the Grunts and the Cops --
17. Old and new restraints --
Bucking (the Parrot's Perch) --
The Crapaudine --
Standing handcuffs --
Sweatboxes --
Adapting old restraints --
The Shabeh --
Remembering the Allied POWs --
18. Noise --
Low-technology noise --
High-technology noise --
The CIA and sensory deprivation boxes --
Beyond the laboratory --
Principles and guinea pigs --
Remembering evil --
19. Drugs and doctors --
Police and drugs --
The CIA and drugs --
The decline of pharmacological torture --
Soviet pharmacological torture --
Communist psychoprisons --
Lines of defense --
Remembering the prison doctors. V. Politics and memory --
20. Supply and demand for clean torture --
Historical claims --
The priority of public monitoring --
Variations among and within states --
National styles of stealth torture --
The strength of low technology --
The power of whispers --
Why styles change --
Disciplinary interventions --
The demand for torture --
21. Does torture work? --
Can torture be scientific? --
Can torture be restrained? --
Does technology help? --
CAn torture be professionally conducted? --
Works better than what? --
Is anything better than nothing? --
How well do interrogators spot the truth? --
How well do cooperative prisoners remember? --
How good is the intelligence overall? --
Even when time is short? --
Remembering the questions --
22. What the apologists say --
Remembering the Battle of Algiers --
Information in the Battle of Algiers --
French interrogation units --
Coerced information in the Algerian War --
Saving innocents, losing wars --
Gestapo stories --
Stories from the Resistance --
CIA stories --
The interrogation of al Qaeda --
Abu Ghraib and Guantánamo --
Afghanistan --
testimonial literature from other conflicts --
Remembering Abu Ghraib --
23. Why governments don't learn --
How knowledge does not accumulate --
How knowledge is not analyzed --
How torture warrants might help --
Regulating torture --
Variations in regulative failure --
Stealth and the regulation of torture --
How knowledge does not matter --
Remembering the soldiers --
24. The great age of torture in modern memory --
The great rift --
The architecture of amnesia --
The designs of genius --
Demons in the city --
Algerian souvenirs --
Caring for the memories. Appendixes: A. List of clean tortures --
B. Issues of method --
C. Organizations and explanations --
D.A note on sources for American torture during the Vietnam War.
Responsibility: Darius Rejali.
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Abstract:

Takes the reader from the late nineteenth century to the aftermath of Abu Ghraib, from slavery and the electric chair to electrotorture in American inner cities, and from French and British colonial  Read more...

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Winner of the 2009 Lemkin Award, Institute for the Study of Genocide Winner of the 2008 Best Book, Human Rights Section of the American Political Science Association "Rejali's approach is to track Read more...

 
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schema:description"III. A history of electric stealth -- 6. Shock -- The AC/DC controversy and the electric chair -- The mystery of electric death -- Early police devices -- The mystery of shock -- Early medical devices -- Transmitting shock -- Later medical devices -- Remembering the animals -- 7. Magnetos -- What is a magneto? -- Indochina -- Out of Indochina -- Korea -- Out of Korea -- The lost history of the magneto -- French and British electrotorture after World War II -- The Colonial police and Wuillaume's list -- the triumph of the Gégène -- Algeria -- Remembering the Gestapo -- 8. Currents -- South Vietnamese torture -- Vietnam -- Bell Telephone Hour -- Out of Vietnam again -- Variation within the French style -- Cattle prods -- The electric cornucopia -- Remembering Vietnam -- 9. Singing the world electric -- When electrotorture was new -- Explaining clean electrotorture -- Crafting electrotorture -- Surging forward -- The Americas -- Middle East and North Africa -- Asia -- Sub-Saharan Africa -- Europe and Central Asia -- Explaining the surge -- Remembering the Cold War -- 10. Prods, tasers, and stun guns -- Electric utopia -- Electric-free protest -- Stun technology -- Covering America -- Remembering Eutopia -- Stun city -- Magneto torture in Chicago -- Stun and torture -- Tasers and torture -- Burning issues -- Stun and democracy -- But no one died -- Civic shock -- Welcome to Stun City."@en
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schema:description"IV. Other stealth traditions -- Introduction -- 12. Sticks and bones -- Clean whipping -- Paddles -- Beating feet -- Remembering slaves and sailors -- 13. Water, sleep, and spice -- Pumping -- Choking -- Showers and ice -- Salt and spice -- Deprivation of sleep -- Remembering the Inquisition -- 14. Stress and duress -- Great and lesser stress traditions -- British stress tortures -- French stress tortures -- American stress tortures -- Authoritarian adaptations -- Remembering the Eighteenth Century -- 15. Forced standing and other positions -- Old user after the War -- Positional tortures in the Communist world -- Positional tortures in the non-Communist world -- The universal distributor hypothesis revisited -- Remembering the Hooded Men -- Fists and exercises -- Clean beating -- Adapting "the necktie" -- Exhaustion exercises -- Remembering the Grunts and the Cops -- 17. Old and new restraints -- Bucking (the Parrot's Perch) -- The Crapaudine -- Standing handcuffs -- Sweatboxes -- Adapting old restraints -- The Shabeh -- Remembering the Allied POWs -- 18. Noise -- Low-technology noise -- High-technology noise -- The CIA and sensory deprivation boxes -- Beyond the laboratory -- Principles and guinea pigs -- Remembering evil -- 19. Drugs and doctors -- Police and drugs -- The CIA and drugs -- The decline of pharmacological torture -- Soviet pharmacological torture -- Communist psychoprisons -- Lines of defense -- Remembering the prison doctors."@en
schema:description""This is the most comprehensive, and most comprehensively chilling, study of modern torture yet written. Darius Rejali, one of the world's leading experts on torture, takes the reader from the late nineteenth century to the aftermath of Abu Ghraib, from slavery and the electric chair to electro-torture in American inner cities, and from French and British colonial prison cells and the Spanish-American War to the fields of Vietnam, the wars of the Middle East, and the new democracies of Latin America and Europe. As Rejali traces the development and application of one torture technique after another in these settings, he reaches startling conclusions. As the twentieth century progressed, he argues, democracies not only tortured, but set the international pace for torture. Dictatorships may have tortured more, and more indiscriminately, but the United States, Britain, and France pioneered and exported techniques that have become the lingua franca of modern torture: methods that leave no marks. Under the watchful eyes of reporters and human rights activists, low-level authorities in the world's oldest democracies were the first to learn that to scar a victim was to advertise iniquity and invite scandal. Long before the CIA even existed, police and soldiers turned instead to "clean" techniques, such as torture by electricity, ice, water, noise, drugs, and stress positions. As democracy and human rights spread after World War II, so too did these methods."--Publisher's description."@en
schema:description"I. Torture and democracy -- 1. Modern torture and its observers -- Defining torture -- Monitoring torture -- 2. Torture and democracy -- The National Security Model -- The Juridical Model -- The Civic Discipline Model -- Hell is in the details."@en
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