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Touring imprisonment: A descriptive statistical analysis of prison museums
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Touring imprisonment: A descriptive statistical analysis of prison museums

Author: Jeffrey Ian Ross Affiliation: School of Criminal Justice, College of Public Affairs, University of Baltimore, 1420 North Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21201, United States
Edition/Format: Article Article : English
Publication:Tourism Management Perspectives, v4 (October 2012): 113-118
Database:ScienceDirect
Summary:
This paper briefly reviews the scholarly literature about jail and prison museums. Then it presents the rationale and methods for developing a database on these worldwide museums (n=  Read more...
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Document Type: Article
All Authors / Contributors: Jeffrey Ian Ross Affiliation: School of Criminal Justice, College of Public Affairs, University of Baltimore, 1420 North Charles St., Baltimore, MD 21201, United States
ISSN:2211-9736
Language Note: English
Unique Identifier: 4936937442
Notes: Jeffrey Ian Ross, Ph.D. is a Professor in the School of Criminal Justice, College of Public Affairs, and a Research Fellow of the Center for International and Comparative Law at the University of Baltimore.
He has researched, written, and lectured primarily on corrections, policing, political crime, violence, and crime and justice in American Indian communities for over two decades. He is the author, co-author, editor, or co-editor of seventeen books.
From 1995-1998, Ross was a Social Science Analyst with the National Institute of Justice, a Division of the U.S. Department of Justice. In 2003, he was awarded the University of Baltimore's Distinguished Chair in Research Award. During the early 1980s, Jeff worked almost four years in a correctional institution.
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Abstract:

This paper briefly reviews the scholarly literature about jail and prison museums. Then it presents the rationale and methods for developing a database on these worldwide museums (n=95). Data on 13 variables were collected. The study reviews the results of the data collected on 10 of the variables that were coded, and discusses the implications of the data. The results indicate that the majority of prison museums are located in advanced industrialized countries, with the United States having the largest number. Most of the prison museums in the United States are in California, Colorado, and Texas. Although one of the museums covered by the database was opened as a correctional facility in 860, the majority of museums worldwide operated as jails and prisons over the past 150years and were converted into prison museums after the 1960s. The fact that the United States has the greatest number of prisons reinforces both the reality and the perception of this country as one of the most punitive countries in the world.

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