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Traditional Jewish papercuts : an inner world of art and symbol

Author: Joseph Shadur; Yehudit Shadur
Publisher: Hanover : University Press of New England, ©2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The making of devotional papercuts is a relatively little-known aspect of traditional Jewish folk art and culture. While many ritual objects treasured today as "Judaica" were crafted from expensive materials, often by gentile artisans executing paid commissions, even the poorest Jew could afford paper, pencil, and penknife with which to make a papercut as a deeply felt, personal expression of faith. Many of these  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Joseph Shadur; Yehudit Shadur
ISBN: 1584651652 9781584651659
OCLC Number: 47625265
Notes: Maps on endpapers.
Description: xviii, 263 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 29 cm.
Contents: Paper, papercutting arts, and shadow theater figures in different cultures --
Jewish papercutting traditions in Ashkenazi and Sephardi communities : an historical/cultural overview --
Uses, symbols, and inscriptions --
A closer look at some Jewish folk papercuts throughout the Diaspora --
Studies and conjectures in sources, symbolisms, and techniques --
Jews in silhouette --
Documenting a tradition --
Multiples, imitations, and frauds : folk art and the collectors' market --
So you've found an old Jewish papercut!
Responsibility: Joseph and Yehudit Shadur.

Abstract:

The definitive work on papercuts, a long-overlooked aspect of Jewish folk art.  Read more...

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schema:reviewBody""The making of devotional papercuts is a relatively little-known aspect of traditional Jewish folk art and culture. While many ritual objects treasured today as "Judaica" were crafted from expensive materials, often by gentile artisans executing paid commissions, even the poorest Jew could afford paper, pencil, and penknife with which to make a papercut as a deeply felt, personal expression of faith. Many of these works are gems of unaffected artistic creation. More than any other form of Jewish art, the surviving old Jewish papercuts evoke the spirit and lore of the East-European shtetl and the North African mellah. By the mid-twentieth century, however, the venerable Jewish papercutting tradition had become another lost folk art." "This illustrated, full-color book, prefaced by Daniel Sperber and William L. Gross, features many Jewish papercuts from Eastern and Central Europe reproduced here for the first time. These, and such works from Middle Eastern, North African, and North American Jewish communities, incorporate an unparalleled wealth of Jewish symbols. Joseph and Yehudit Shadur's discussions of these configurations constitute a basic presentation of Jewish iconography of the last three centuries. Traditional Jewish Papercuts is the culmination of over 25 years of research on four continents."--BOOK JACKET."
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