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A traitor and a scoundrel : Benjamin Hedrick and the cost of dissent

Author: Michael Thomas Smith
Publisher: Newark : University of Delaware Press ; London : Associated University Presses, ©2003.
Edition/Format:   Book : Biography : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In the fall of 1856, a young chemistry professor at the University of North Carolina suddenly found himself perhaps the most unpopular man in the state. Benjamin Hedrick, after publicly announcing his preference for the antislavery Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont and writing a public letter defending this position, found himself denounced by newspapers across the South as a traitor to his region  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Smith, Michael Thomas, 1970-
Traitor and a scoundrel.
Newark : University of Delaware Press ; London : Associated University Presses, c2003
(OCoLC)593889812
Online version:
Smith, Michael Thomas, 1970-
Traitor and a scoundrel.
Newark : University of Delaware Press ; London : Associated University Presses, c2003
(OCoLC)607019706
Named Person: Benjamin Sherwood Hedrick
Material Type: Biography, Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Thomas Smith
ISBN: 0874138418 9780874138412
OCLC Number: 52070667
Description: 216 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Those misguided, wicked men: North Carolina and antislavery dissent, 1829-1956 --
A traitor and a scoundrel: the making of a dissenter in the Old South --
Benjamin Hedrick and agricultural reform in antebellum North Carolina --
A dissenter's ordeal --
Exile --
A dissenter's civil war --
You will certainly be crushed: Benjamin Hedrick and reconstruction in North Carolina --
Examining the examiner.
Responsibility: Michael Thomas Smith.
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Abstract:

In 1856, Benjamin Hedrick broke with his white North Carolinian peers by taking an antislavery position on the question of the incorporation of the territories. This biography tells the story of how  Read more...

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schema:reviewBody""In the fall of 1856, a young chemistry professor at the University of North Carolina suddenly found himself perhaps the most unpopular man in the state. Benjamin Hedrick, after publicly announcing his preference for the antislavery Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont and writing a public letter defending this position, found himself denounced by newspapers across the South as a traitor to his region and a potential corrupter of its young people. Students at the university taunted him and burned him in effigy, while his friends and colleagues nervously distanced themselves from him. He was dismissed in short order, and a few days later a mob in his hometown threatened and humiliated him, resulting in his virtual exile to the North. Surprisingly, Benjamin Hedrick, one of the very few prominent white Southerners to take a public stand against slavery in the decades leading to the Civil War, has received scant attention from historians. His posthumous descent into obscurity represented one final penalty for his courageous dissent. This biography ends that neglect." "Historians have long recognized Hedrick's firing as a defining moment in the Old South's movement toward becoming a closed society on the issue of slavery, and as the foremost example of the region's lack of academic freedom. This biography explores these and other forgotten aspects of Hedrick's career that warrant further examination. This vigorous Southern dissenter also played active roles in the Southern agricultural reform movement, Civil War Unionism, Reconstruction, and administrative reform in the U.S. Patent Office, where he worked for the last twenty-five years of his stormy life. By the time of his death in 1886, the movement toward sectional reconciliation contributed to the eclipse in the national memory of the role of dissenters like Hedrick in the turbulent Civil War era. His story, which reveals much about the limits and costs of nineteenth-century Southern dissent, is here fully explored for the first time."--Jacket."
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