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Transport of dredged sediment placed in the nearshore zone--Currituck sand-bypass study (phase I)

Author: Robert K Schwartz; Frank R Musialowski; Coastal Engineering Research Center (U.S.)
Publisher: Fort Belvoir, Va. : U.S. Army, Corps of Engineers, Coastal Engineering Research Center ; Springfield, Va. : National Technical Information Service [distributor], [1980]
Series: Technical paper (Coastal Engineering Research Center (U.S.)), no. 80-1.
Edition/Format:   Print book : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
New dredge-disposal techniques may serve the dual role of aiding sand by-passing across coastal inlets, and beach nourishment, provided the dredged sediments placed seaward of the surf zone move shoreward into that zone. During the summer of 1976, 26,750 cubic meters of relatively coarse sediment was dredged from New River Inlet, North Carolina, moved down coast by a split-hull barge, and placed in a 215-meter  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Government publication, National government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Robert K Schwartz; Frank R Musialowski; Coastal Engineering Research Center (U.S.)
OCLC Number: 6282860
Notes: Cover title.
"February 1980."
Description: 52 pages : illustrations, 1 map ; 28 cm.
Series Title: Technical paper (Coastal Engineering Research Center (U.S.)), no. 80-1.
Responsibility: by Robert K. Schwartz and Frank R. Musialowski.

Abstract:

New dredge-disposal techniques may serve the dual role of aiding sand by-passing across coastal inlets, and beach nourishment, provided the dredged sediments placed seaward of the surf zone move shoreward into that zone. During the summer of 1976, 26,750 cubic meters of relatively coarse sediment was dredged from New River Inlet, North Carolina, moved down coast by a split-hull barge, and placed in a 215-meter coastal reach between the 2- and 4-meter depth contours. Bathymetric changes on the disposal piles and in the adjacent beach and nearshore area were studied for a 13-week period (August to November 1976) to determine the modification of the surrounding beach and nearshore profile, and the net transport direction of the disposal sediment. The sediment piles initially created a local shoal zone with minimum depths of 0.6 meter. Disposal sediment was coarser (Mn = 0.49 millimeter) than the native sand at the disposal site (Mn = 0.14 millimeter) and coarser than the composite mean grain size of the entire profile (Mn = 0.21 millimeter). Shoaling and breaking waves caused rapid erosion of the pile tops and a gradual coalescing of the piles to form a disposal bar located seaward (= 90 meters) of a naturally occurring surf zone bar. As the disposal bar relief was reduced, the disposal bar-associated breaker zone was restricted to low tide times or periods of high wave conditions.

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