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Treatise on fugue. Part 1: The school fugue.

Author: André Gédalge
Publisher: Mattapan, Mass., Gamut Music Co. [©1964]
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Gédalge, André, 1856-1926.
Treatise on fugue.
Mattapan, Mass., Gamut Music Co. [©1964]
(OCoLC)655036948
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: André Gédalge
OCLC Number: 917101
Notes: Originally published in 1901 under Traité de la fugue.
No more published.
Description: xii, 350 pages music 28 cm
Contents: Preface --
I. GENERAL DEFINITIONS --
Definitions --
Etymology --
Essential parts of the fugue --
II. THE SUBJECT --
Essential characteristics of a subject --
Rhythm --
Melody --
Range --
Length --
Modality --
Tonality --
The head of the subject --
III. THE ANSWER --
Definition --
Tonality of the answer --
Order of modulations is the reverse of the order of modulations of the subject --
Tonic of the answer --
General rules --
Underlying harmony of the answer corresponds to the underlying harmony of the subject --
Purpose of these rules --
Real fugue, real answer --
Tonal fugue, tonal answer --
Modulation to the key of the dominant by means of characteristic alterations --
Modulations peculiar to the fugue, concerning exclusively the head and end of the subject --
Tonality of the first, third, fifth, and seventh degrees of the main key according to their position at the beginning or end of the subject --
Harmonic function of these degrees --
Answer to a subject beginning and ending on the tonic or mediant and not using the fifth degree or using it only as a passing tone, auxiliary tone, or in a sequence --
Answer to a subject beginning on the dominant --
Raised fourth degree at the beginning of the subject --
Summary table of answers to subjects going from the dominant to the first degree --
Theory of the tonal role of the fifth degree --
Answer to a subject which, beginning on the tonic or mediant, goes to the dominant or the seventh degree (unaltered in the minor mode) followed by the fifth degree: (1) directly; (2) with several other degrees in between --
Tonal function of these degrees --
How they are answered --
Summary table of answers to subjects going from the tonic to the fifth degree --
Fourth degree of the main key considered as the seventh degree of the dominant key --
Return of the subject to the main key after a modulation --
Real answer to a tonal subject --
Answer to a subject modulating to the key of the dominant by means of an alteration characteristic of this key, the alteration either written or implied in the harmony: subjects analyzed from this viewpoint --
Mutation; its effects --
Answer to a chromatic subject --
Answer to a subject beginning on the seventh degree of the major mode; on the seventh degree of the minor mode; with the raised fourth degree; with the second, fourth, or sixth degrees --
Summary --
IV. THE COUNTERSUBJECT --
Definition --
Characteristics of the countersubject --
Mutation in the countersubject --
Entry of the countersubject --
Employment of suspensions --
Nomenclature of fugues in accordance with the number of countersubjects --
Construction of the countersubject --
Harmonic analysis --
Preliminary sketch of the countersubject --
Chromatic countersubjects --
Summary tables --
V. THE EXPOSITION OF THE FUGUE --
Definitions --
Entries of the countersubject --
Subject assigned to a voice of corresponding tessitura --
Entry of the answer --
Codetta of the subject --
Second codetta --
Introduction of a new figure --
Unison avoided --
Free voices --
Dispositions of the voices in expositions of two, three, and four voices with one, two, and three countersubjects --
Models of expositions in two, three, and four voices --
VI. THE COUNTER-EXPOSITION --
Definitions --
Tonality --
Place of the countersubject --
Dispositions of two, three, and four voices --
Model of a counter exposition of four voices --
First section of the fugue --
VII. THE FUGAL EPISODE --
Definition --
Use of harmonic sequences --
Quality of the episode --
Source of motives --
Preparation --
Analysis of the exposition with a view to choosing motives for the episode --
Construction of the melodic line of the episode --
Harmonic and melodic plan --
Plan of execution --
Realization --
Episode with one or several motives --
The main motive of an episode remains in one key --
Melodic invention --
Disposition of imitations --
Procedures in the construction of an episode --
Construction of the canonic episode --
Episode using different motives successfully --
Use of inversion --
Use of retrograde and retrograde inversion in combination --
Augmentation --
Diminution --
Augmentation and diminution combined with inversion and retrograde --
Double augmentation --
Double diminution --
Conclusion --
VIII. THE STRETTO --
Definitions --
Canonic stretto --
Disposition of voices --
Unisons avoided --
Reversed canonic stretto --
Incomplete canon --
Interruption of subject and answer --
Tonality --
Harmonic agreement of the entries --
Free strettos --
Finding strettos --
Canonic strettos made with the help of a supporting harmonic part --
Canons and strettos at different intervals --
Equidistance of entries --
Preliminary disposition in four voices --
Stretto with asymmetrical entries --
Nomenclature of strettos --
Strettos of the countersubject --
Strettos combining subject and countersubject --
Stretto in inversion --
Stretto in direct motion and inversion --
Stretto in diminution --
Stretto in augmentation --
Canonic stretto in direct motion, inversion, and augmentation --
Stretto in augmentation and diminution combined --
Stretto in retrograde --
IX. THE PEDAL --
Definition --
Harmonic rules --
Role of the pedal --
Double pedal --
Place of the pedal --
Pedal on the dominant --
Tonic pedal --
Ornamented pedal, simple and multiple --
X. MODULATIONS OF THE FUGUE --
Second section of the fugue --
Related keys --
Order of modulations in a fugue with subject in the major mode; in the minor mode --
Length of the episodes --
Dimensions of the fugue --
Modulations to the mode parallel that of the main key --
Transposition of the subject to the parallel mode --
XI. CONSTRUCTION OF THE STRETTO SECTION --
Tonality and disposition of the first and last strettos --
Procedures of construction --
Stretto composed solely of canons of the subject and answer --
Strettos of subject and countersubject in alternation --
Strettos alternating with episodes --
Episodes in the stretto --
Linking the episode with strettos --
Overall construction of the stretto --
Place of the pedal --
Reversed stretto --
Example analyzed --
XII. MUSICAL COMPOSITION OF THE FUGUE --
Musical characteristics of the fugue --
The fugue as the development of a musical idea --
Continuity of texture; in the melodic line --
Use of the perfect cadence --
Style of the fugue --
Expressive role of the countersubject and the free parts --
Unity of style --
Unity of expression --
Character and style of the episodes --
Musical considerations in the choice of motives --
Melodic invention --
Various methods of linking the stretto with the last episode of the second section of the fugue --
Musical function of the pedal point --
Its logical position --
Its importance --
Its musical composition in reference to its assigned place in the fugue --
Melodic continuity of the stretto --
Musical plan of the stretto as a whole --
Place of the tonic pedal --
Conclusion of the fugue --
XIII. THE INTRODUCTION OF A NEW SUBJECT AND THE MODIFICATIONS WHICH A SUBJECT CAN UNDERGO IN THE COURSE OF A FUGUE --
Definition of a new subject; its style; its character --
Its characteristics; how it differs from the main subject and its countersubject; its length --
Its place in the fugue --
The new subject accompanied or not by a countersubject --
Order of modulations in a fugue which contains a new subject --
Construction of the stretto of a fugue which contains a new subject --
Procedures in the construction of a new subject --
Analysis of a fugue of Bach which contains two new subjects --
Overall structure of a fugue under these conditions --
Modifications which a subject can undergo [In its rhythm --
In its length --
In its initial note --
In its final note --
Modifications of the answer] --
XIV. ORDER AND METHOD OF PROCEDURE IN THE WRITING OF A FUGUE. GENERAL SUMMARY --
Order of procedure --
Writing the answer --
Choosing the countersubjects; a new subject; strettos and canons --
Exposition --
Plan of the fugue --
Stretto --
General summary --
Overall plan for the composition of a fugue: (1) melodic and harmonic plan; (2) plan of execution; (3) realization --
Models of complete fugues --
FUGUE SUBJECTS --
INDEX.
Other Titles: Traité de la fugue.
Responsibility: Translated by A. Levin. Edited with an introd. by S.B. Potter.

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THE ANSWER -- Definition -- Tonality of the answer -- Order of modulations is the reverse of the order of modulations of the subject -- Tonic of the answer -- General rules -- Underlying harmony of the answer corresponds to the underlying harmony of the subject -- Purpose of these rules -- Real fugue, real answer -- Tonal fugue, tonal answer -- Modulation to the key of the dominant by means of characteristic alterations -- Modulations peculiar to the fugue, concerning exclusively the head and end of the subject -- Tonality of the first, third, fifth, and seventh degrees of the main key according to their position at the beginning or end of the subject -- Harmonic function of these degrees -- Answer to a subject beginning and ending on the tonic or mediant and not using the fifth degree or using it only as a passing tone, auxiliary tone, or in a sequence -- Answer to a subject beginning on the dominant -- Raised fourth degree at the beginning of the subject -- Summary table of answers to subjects going from the dominant to the first degree -- Theory of the tonal role of the fifth degree -- Answer to a subject which, beginning on the tonic or mediant, goes to the dominant or the seventh degree (unaltered in the minor mode) followed by the fifth degree: (1) directly; (2) with several other degrees in between -- Tonal function of these degrees -- How they are answered -- Summary table of answers to subjects going from the tonic to the fifth degree -- Fourth degree of the main key considered as the seventh degree of the dominant key -- Return of the subject to the main key after a modulation -- Real answer to a tonal subject -- Answer to a subject modulating to the key of the dominant by means of an alteration characteristic of this key, the alteration either written or implied in the harmony: subjects analyzed from this viewpoint -- Mutation; its effects -- Answer to a chromatic subject -- Answer to a subject beginning on the seventh degree of the major mode; on the seventh degree of the minor mode; with the raised fourth degree; with the second, fourth, or sixth degrees -- Summary -- IV. THE COUNTERSUBJECT -- Definition -- Characteristics of the countersubject -- Mutation in the countersubject -- Entry of the countersubject -- Employment of suspensions -- Nomenclature of fugues in accordance with the number of countersubjects -- Construction of the countersubject -- Harmonic analysis -- Preliminary sketch of the countersubject -- Chromatic countersubjects -- Summary tables -- V. THE EXPOSITION OF THE FUGUE -- Definitions -- Entries of the countersubject -- Subject assigned to a voice of corresponding tessitura -- Entry of the answer -- Codetta of the subject -- Second codetta -- Introduction of a new figure -- Unison avoided -- Free voices -- Dispositions of the voices in expositions of two, three, and four voices with one, two, and three countersubjects -- Models of expositions in two, three, and four voices -- VI. THE COUNTER-EXPOSITION -- Definitions -- Tonality -- Place of the countersubject -- Dispositions of two, three, and four voices -- Model of a counter exposition of four voices -- First section of the fugue -- VII. THE FUGAL EPISODE -- Definition -- Use of harmonic sequences -- Quality of the episode -- Source of motives -- Preparation -- Analysis of the exposition with a view to choosing motives for the episode -- Construction of the melodic line of the episode -- Harmonic and melodic plan -- Plan of execution -- Realization -- Episode with one or several motives -- The main motive of an episode remains in one key -- Melodic invention -- Disposition of imitations -- Procedures in the construction of an episode -- Construction of the canonic episode -- Episode using different motives successfully -- Use of inversion -- Use of retrograde and retrograde inversion in combination -- Augmentation -- Diminution -- Augmentation and diminution combined with inversion and retrograde -- Double augmentation -- Double diminution -- Conclusion -- VIII. THE STRETTO -- Definitions -- Canonic stretto -- Disposition of voices -- Unisons avoided -- Reversed canonic stretto -- Incomplete canon -- Interruption of subject and answer -- Tonality -- Harmonic agreement of the entries -- Free strettos -- Finding strettos -- Canonic strettos made with the help of a supporting harmonic part -- Canons and strettos at different intervals -- Equidistance of entries -- Preliminary disposition in four voices -- Stretto with asymmetrical entries -- Nomenclature of strettos -- Strettos of the countersubject -- Strettos combining subject and countersubject -- Stretto in inversion -- Stretto in direct motion and inversion -- Stretto in diminution -- Stretto in augmentation -- Canonic stretto in direct motion, inversion, and augmentation -- Stretto in augmentation and diminution combined -- Stretto in retrograde -- IX. THE PEDAL -- Definition -- Harmonic rules -- Role of the pedal -- Double pedal -- Place of the pedal -- Pedal on the dominant -- Tonic pedal -- Ornamented pedal, simple and multiple -- X. MODULATIONS OF THE FUGUE -- Second section of the fugue -- Related keys -- Order of modulations in a fugue with subject in the major mode; in the minor mode -- Length of the episodes -- Dimensions of the fugue -- Modulations to the mode parallel that of the main key -- Transposition of the subject to the parallel mode -- XI. CONSTRUCTION OF THE STRETTO SECTION -- Tonality and disposition of the first and last strettos -- Procedures of construction -- Stretto composed solely of canons of the subject and answer -- Strettos of subject and countersubject in alternation -- Strettos alternating with episodes -- Episodes in the stretto -- Linking the episode with strettos -- Overall construction of the stretto -- Place of the pedal -- Reversed stretto -- Example analyzed -- XII. MUSICAL COMPOSITION OF THE FUGUE -- Musical characteristics of the fugue -- The fugue as the development of a musical idea -- Continuity of texture; in the melodic line -- Use of the perfect cadence -- Style of the fugue -- Expressive role of the countersubject and the free parts -- Unity of style -- Unity of expression -- Character and style of the episodes -- Musical considerations in the choice of motives -- Melodic invention -- Various methods of linking the stretto with the last episode of the second section of the fugue -- Musical function of the pedal point -- Its logical position -- Its importance -- Its musical composition in reference to its assigned place in the fugue -- Melodic continuity of the stretto -- Musical plan of the stretto as a whole -- Place of the tonic pedal -- Conclusion of the fugue -- XIII. THE INTRODUCTION OF A NEW SUBJECT AND THE MODIFICATIONS WHICH A SUBJECT CAN UNDERGO IN THE COURSE OF A FUGUE -- Definition of a new subject; its style; its character -- Its characteristics; how it differs from the main subject and its countersubject; its length -- Its place in the fugue -- The new subject accompanied or not by a countersubject -- Order of modulations in a fugue which contains a new subject -- Construction of the stretto of a fugue which contains a new subject -- Procedures in the construction of a new subject -- Analysis of a fugue of Bach which contains two new subjects -- Overall structure of a fugue under these conditions -- Modifications which a subject can undergo [In its rhythm -- In its length -- In its initial note -- In its final note -- Modifications of the answer] -- XIV. ORDER AND METHOD OF PROCEDURE IN THE WRITING OF A FUGUE. 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