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Treatise on harmony.

Author: Jean-Philippe Rameau
Publisher: New York, Dover Publications [1971]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jean-Philippe Rameau
ISBN: 0486224619 9780486224619
OCLC Number: 131217
Description: lv, 444 pages facsimiles, music 24 cm
Contents: Book One: On the relationship between harmonic ratios and proportions --
1. On music and sound --
2. On the different ways in which the relationship between sounds can be known to us --
3. On the origin of consonances and on their relationships --
4. Remarks on the properties of the harmonic and arithmetic proportions --
5. On the origin of dissonances and on their relationships --
6. On doubled intervals, and especially on the ninth and the eleventh --
7. On harmonic division, or on the origin of chords --
8. On the inversion of chords --
9. Remarks on all the preceding chords --
10. Remarks on the different ratios which can be given to a single chord --
11. How to relate the ratios given by the divisions to the vibrations and to the multiplication of lengths Book Two: On the nature and properties of chords and on everything which may be used to make music perfect --
1. On the fundamental sound of harmony and on its progression --
2. On the chords appropriate to fundamental sounds and on their progression --
3. On the nature and properties of the octave --
On the nature and properties of the fifth and the fourth --
5. On the perfect cadence, in which the nature and properties of all the intervals are found --
6. On the deceptive cadence --
7. On the irregular cadence --
8. On the imitation of cadences by inversion --
9. On how to avoid cadences by imitating them --
10. On chords by supposition with which we may also avoid cadences by imitating them --
11. On the fourth and the eleventh --
12. On chords by borrowing with which we may avoid perfect cadences by imitating them --
13. Rule for the progression of dissonances, derived from the progression of fundamental chords --
14. Remarks on the progression of thirds and sixths --
15. On occasions when the seventh should be suppressed from the ninth chord --
16. On dissonant consonances, in which the fourth is discussed together with the false idea of it that exists because of superfluous rules --
17. On license --
18. Observations on establishing rules, in which the method of composing a fundamental bass is taught --
19. Continuation of the preceding chapter, in which it appears that melody arises from harmony --
20. On the properties of chords --
21. On the modes --
22. On the origin of our liberty to pass from one mode or from one key to another --
23. On the properties of modes and keys --
24. On meter --
25. On the usefulness of this new way of indicating different meters --
26. On the number of measures each air should contain, and on their characteristic movements --
27. How to proceed when setting words to music --
28. On design, imitation, fugue, and on their properties --
29. On those intervals which should be classified as major and minor ; as just or perfect ; as augmented and diminished Book Three: Principles of composition --
1. Introduction to practical music --
2. On the fundamental bass --
3. On the perfect chord, with which composition in four parts begins --
4. On the succession of chords --
5. On several rules which must be observed --
6. On the seventh chord --
7. Remarks on dissonance --
8. On key and mode --
9. On how to modulate harmonically when the bass is given a diatonic progression --
10. On the bass continuo --
11. On the progression of the bass, which simultaneously determines the progression of the chords ; how we may relate a derived chord to its fundamental --
12. Continuation of the rules drawn from the preceding example --
13. On the perfect cadence --
14. On the leading tone, and on how all dissonances are resolved --
15. On the eleventh, called the fourth --
16. On the irregular cadence --
17. On the different progressions of a bass which are related to one another in such a way that the harmony in the upper parts does not change at all --
18. On how to prepare dissonances --
19. On occasions when dissonances cannot be prepared --
20. A precise enumeration of the different progressions of the bass, according to the different dissonances used there --
21. On the chord of the second --
22. On keys and modes in general --
23. On how to pass from one key to another; i.e., on how to modulate --
24. Continuation of the rules contained in the preceding chapter --
25. How to know which chords must be given to the bass notes in any progression --
26. How to use the seventh on every note of a key in a diatonic progression --
27. How the same dissonance may occur in several consecutive chords on different notes; how it may be resolved by notes which appear to be foreign --
28. On all licenses, beginning with the deceptive cadence --
29. On the chord of the augmented fifth --
30. On the ninth chord --
31. On the eleventh chord, called the fourth --
32. On the chord of the augmented seventh --
33. On the chord of the augmented second and on its derivatives --
34. On chromaticism --
35. On how to make use of everything we have discussed hitherto --
36. On composition in two parts --
37. On false relations --
38. On how to write a melody above a bass --
39. On ornamental melody or supposition --
40. On how to compose a fundamental bass below a treble --
41. How to compose a basso Continuo below a treble --
42. Useful remarks concerning the preceding chapter --
43. Rules to be observed in a composition in two, three, and four parts --
44. On design, imitation, and future Book Four: Principles of accompaniment --
1. How to recognize the intervals from the arrangement of the keyboard --
2. On the difference between major and minor intervals ; and between those which are perfect and those which are augmented or diminished --
3. On the position of the hand and on the arrangement of the fingers --
4. On how to find chords on the keyboard --
5. Useful remarks concerning all the chords --
6. On keys and modes --
7. On the order which must be followed for the succession of chords found within the octave of each key --
8. General rules --
9. On the different chords which should follow the seventh chords when the bass note remains on the same degree --
10. On the chord of the second --
11. On chords of the sixth --
12. On the chord of the augmented second and on its derivatives --
13. On chords by suppositions --
14. Observations on the relations between all the preceding chords --
15. On how to prepare and resolve all dissonances from which we shall come to know the key in use and the chords which each note of this key should bear --
16. On chromaticism --
17. Recapitulation of the various successions of chords --
18. Rules which are necessary in order to accompany properly --
19. On how to figure a Basso Continuo, and on how to know which chords each figure denotes --
20. How to tell which Bass notes should bear a chord.
Other Titles: Traité de l'harmonie.
Responsibility: Translated with an introd. and notes by Philip Gossett.
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schema:description"Book Three: Principles of composition -- 1. Introduction to practical music -- 2. On the fundamental bass -- 3. On the perfect chord, with which composition in four parts begins -- 4. On the succession of chords -- 5. On several rules which must be observed -- 6. On the seventh chord -- 7. Remarks on dissonance -- 8. On key and mode -- 9. On how to modulate harmonically when the bass is given a diatonic progression -- 10. On the bass continuo -- 11. On the progression of the bass, which simultaneously determines the progression of the chords ; how we may relate a derived chord to its fundamental -- 12. Continuation of the rules drawn from the preceding example -- 13. On the perfect cadence -- 14. On the leading tone, and on how all dissonances are resolved -- 15. On the eleventh, called the fourth -- 16. On the irregular cadence -- 17. On the different progressions of a bass which are related to one another in such a way that the harmony in the upper parts does not change at all -- 18. On how to prepare dissonances -- 19. On occasions when dissonances cannot be prepared -- 20. A precise enumeration of the different progressions of the bass, according to the different dissonances used there -- 21. On the chord of the second -- 22. On keys and modes in general -- 23. On how to pass from one key to another; i.e., on how to modulate -- 24. Continuation of the rules contained in the preceding chapter -- 25. How to know which chords must be given to the bass notes in any progression -- 26. How to use the seventh on every note of a key in a diatonic progression -- 27. How the same dissonance may occur in several consecutive chords on different notes; how it may be resolved by notes which appear to be foreign -- 28. On all licenses, beginning with the deceptive cadence -- 29. On the chord of the augmented fifth -- 30. On the ninth chord -- 31. On the eleventh chord, called the fourth -- 32. On the chord of the augmented seventh -- 33. On the chord of the augmented second and on its derivatives -- 34. On chromaticism -- 35. On how to make use of everything we have discussed hitherto -- 36. On composition in two parts -- 37. On false relations -- 38. On how to write a melody above a bass -- 39. On ornamental melody or supposition -- 40. On how to compose a fundamental bass below a treble -- 41. How to compose a basso Continuo below a treble -- 42. Useful remarks concerning the preceding chapter -- 43. Rules to be observed in a composition in two, three, and four parts -- 44. On design, imitation, and future"@en
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schema:description"Book Four: Principles of accompaniment -- 1. How to recognize the intervals from the arrangement of the keyboard -- 2. On the difference between major and minor intervals ; and between those which are perfect and those which are augmented or diminished -- 3. On the position of the hand and on the arrangement of the fingers -- 4. On how to find chords on the keyboard -- 5. Useful remarks concerning all the chords -- 6. On keys and modes -- 7. On the order which must be followed for the succession of chords found within the octave of each key -- 8. General rules -- 9. On the different chords which should follow the seventh chords when the bass note remains on the same degree -- 10. On the chord of the second -- 11. On chords of the sixth -- 12. On the chord of the augmented second and on its derivatives -- 13. On chords by suppositions -- 14. Observations on the relations between all the preceding chords -- 15. On how to prepare and resolve all dissonances from which we shall come to know the key in use and the chords which each note of this key should bear -- 16. On chromaticism -- 17. Recapitulation of the various successions of chords -- 18. Rules which are necessary in order to accompany properly -- 19. On how to figure a Basso Continuo, and on how to know which chords each figure denotes -- 20. How to tell which Bass notes should bear a chord."@en
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