skip to content
The triadic structure of the mind : outlines of a philosophical system Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The triadic structure of the mind : outlines of a philosophical system

Author: Francesco Belfiore
Publisher: Lanham : University Press of America, ©2014.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : English : 2nd edView all editions and formats
Summary:
The Triadic Structure of the Mind provides a philosophical system that offers fresh solutions in the fields of ontology, knowledge, ethics, and politics. The second edition includes a more extensive treatment of the topics addressed in the first edition, the introduction of new concepts, and the inclusion of additional thinkers.
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Belfiore, Francesco.
Triadic Structure of the Mind.
Lanham : University Press of America, 2014
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Francesco Belfiore
ISBN: 9780761863670 0761863672
OCLC Number: 881416749
Notes: Includes index.
Description: 1 online resource
Contents: Machine generated contents note: ch. 1 The Structure and Functioning of the Mind --
1.1. The Triadic-Bidirectional Mind: An Overview --
1.1.1. From Descartes's "Cogito" to the Triadic Structure of the Mind --
1.1.1.1. Further Considerations on the Cartesian "Cogito" --
1.1.1.2. The Triadic Structure of the Mind as Understood by Reflections Other than the "Cogito" --
1.1.1.3. Interrelation of the Three Mind Components, of Their Activities, and Their Products --
1.1.1.4. The Bidirectional Activity of the Mind and the Origin of the Moral Values --
1.1.1.5. Mind as an Evolving Entity, whose Evolution is the Moral Good --
1.1.1.6. Defining the Triadic-Bidirectional Mind --
1.1.1.7. Advantages of the Conception of the Unitary-Triadic Mind --
1.1.1.8. Overview of the Judgment Criteria for the Various Mind Products --
1.1.1.8.1. Judgment by "Specific Criteria" --
1.1.1.8.2. Judgment by the "Value Criterion", Valid for All Mind Products --
1.1.1.9. The Triadic-Bidirectional Mind and the Rest of the World --
1.1.1.10. A Note on Terminology --
1.1.2. The Mind: Its Outward (or Selfish) Activities --
1.1.2.1. Intellect: Its Outward or Selfish Activity --
1.1.2.1.1. Ideas, Sentiments, and Actions as Objects of Intellect --
1.1.2.1.2. Intellect as Support of Sensitiveness and Power: "Imaginary Ideas" and "Ideas-of-Projects" --
1.1.2.1.3. The Branches of the Knowledge of Mind --
1.1.2.2. Sensitiveness: Its Outward Activity --
1.1.2.2.1. Sensitiveness and Its Outward Products: Sentiments --
1.1.2.2.2. Sensitiveness as Support of Intellect and of Power --
1.1.2.3. Power: Its Outward Activity and the Physical World --
1.1.2.3.1. Power and Actions --
1.1.2.3.2. The Physical World --
1.1.2.3.3. Power as Support of Intellect and Sensitiveness --
1.1.3. The Mind: Its Inward (or Moral) Activities and the Consciousness --
1.2. The Conception of the Unitary-Triadic Mind Compared to the Main Theories of Mind --
1.2.1. The Main "Dualistic" Theories of Mind --
1.2.2. The Main "Non-Dualistic" and "Non-Monistic" Theories of Mind --
1.2.3. The Main "Monistic" Theories of Mind --
1.2.3.1. The "Triadic Monism" and Other Monistic Theories of Mind --
1.2.3.2. The Uniqueness of the "Triadic-Bidirectional Mind": Comparison with Other Philosophical Doctrines --
1.2.4. The Epistemological Implications of the Conception of the Unitary-Triadic Mind --
1.2.5. Introspection and Self-Knowledge --
1.2.5.1. General Concepts --
1.2.5.2. Intellect and the Rational Awareness --
1.2.5.3. Sensitiveness and the Emotional Awareness --
1.2.5.4. Power and the Practical Awareness --
1.2.5.5. Re-Interpretation of Some Views on Introspection and Self-Knowledge --
ch. 2 A Comprehensive Ontological Conception: The Triadic Monism --
2.1. The Triadic Monism --
2.2. Comparison with Other Philosophical Conceptions --
2.2.1. Comparison with Other Unitary Conceptions --
2.2.2. Comparison with Other Conceptions Based on a "One and Trine" Entity --
2.2.2.1. Comparison with Other Philosophical Systems --
2.2.2.2. Comparison with Some Religious Conceptions --
ch. 3 Intellect and Its Activity: Knowledge and Its Limits --
3.1. The Knowledge of Power: The Physical World and the Actions of Man --
3.1.1. The Knowledge of the Physical World --
3.1.1.1. Objects and the Ideas-of-Object --
3.1.1.1.1. Individual Objects of the Supra-Molecular World --
3.1.1.1.2. Identical Particles of the Molecular-Atomic-Subatomic World --
3.1.1.2. Objects of the Physical World --
3.1.1.2.1. Similar and Yet Diverse Objects of the Supra-Molecular World --
3.1.1.2.2. The Classes of Identical Particles of the Molecular-Atomic-Subatomic World --
3.1.1.2.3. A Unifying Hypothesis of the Physical World: A World Made of Classes of Similar and Yet Diverse Objects --
3.1.1.3. The Creation of "Classes" and "Sets" --
3.1.1.3.1. Heterogeneous Classes Made of Similar but not Identical Objects --
3.1.1.3.2. Homogeneous Classes Made of Identical Particles --
3.1.1.3.3. A Unifying Hypothesis: Are All Classes Made of Similar and Yet Diverse Objects? --
3.1.1.4. Objects, Properties, and Classes: Further Considerations --
3.1.1.4.1. Physical versus Non-Physical Objects and Classes --
3.1.1.4.2. More on Objects, and Properties --
3.1.1.5. Classes and the Knowledge Process --
3.1.1.6. Classes and Some Logical Paradoxes --
3.1.1.7. Classes, Numbers, Mathematics and Geometry --
3.1.1.8. Relations Between Objects and Classes --
3.1.1.9. Relations in Static Conditions --
3.1.1.9.1. Relation of the Object with Itself (Identification) --
3.1.1.9.2. Relations Between Objects (or Inter-Objects Relations) --
3.1.1.9.3. Object-Class Relations --
3.1.1.9.4. Relations Class-to-Class (or Inter-Classes Relations) --
3.1.1.10. Relations in Dynamic Conditions (Dynamic Relations): Events --
3.1.1.10.1. Dynamic Relations of the Object with Itself (Events Affecting a Single Object) 3.1.1.10.2. Dynamic Relations Between Objects: (I) The Cause-Effect Relation --
3.1.1.10.3. Dynamic Relations Between Objects: (II) Relations of Action --
3.1.1.10.4. The Creation of Transformation Laws (Scientific Laws) --
3.1.1.11. The Starting Point of Knowledge and Its Progressive Development --
3.1.1.11.1. The Subject-Object Relation as the Starting Point of Knowledge --
3.1.1.11.2. Subject-Object Relation and Quantum Mechanics --
3.1.1.11.3. The Limits of Knowledge: The "Phenomenon" and the "Noumenon" --
3.1.1.11.4. The Role of the Subconscious --
3.1.1.12. Acquisition of New Knowledge of the Physical World by Inductive Reasoning: From Properties to Objects, Classes, Events, Laws and Theories --
3.1.1.12.1. Assembling Properties into Objects and Observed Changes into Events --
3.1.1.12.2. Grouping Objects into Classes --
3.1.1.12.3. Grouping Events into Transformation Laws (Scientific Laws) and Theories --
3.1.1.13. Utilization of Acquired Knowledge by Deductive Reasoning: Explanations, Previsions and Applications --
3.1.1.13.1. Explanations --
3.1.1.13.2. Previsions --
3.1.1.13.3. Applications (Experiments and Inventions) --
3.1.1.14. Methods of Reasoning for the Acquisition of New Knowledge --
3.1.1.14.1. Propositions about Objects, Events, Classes and Laws --
3.1.1.14.2. Particular Propositions about Objects and Events of the Supra-Molecular World --
3.1.1.14.3. Propositions about Classes and Transformation Laws of the Supra-Molecular World --
3.1.1.14.4. Propositions About Identical Particles (and Their Homogenous Classes) and Regular Events (and Their General Laws) of the Molecular- Atomic-Subatomic World --
3.1.1.15. Methods of Reasoning in the Utilization of Acquired Knowledge --
3.1.1.15.1. Arguments about Objects and Classes of the Supra-Molecular World --
3.1.1.15.2. Arguments about Objects (Particles) and Classes of the Molecular-Atomic-Subatomic World --
3.1.1.15.3. Arguments about Events and Laws of the Supra-Molecular World --
3.1.1.15.4. Arguments about Events and Laws of the Molecular-Atomic-Subatomic World --
3.1.1.15.5. Comments to the Basic Logical Principles --
3.1.1.15.6. More on Logical Principles --
3.1.1.16. Terminology about Precision/Imprecision and Certainty/Uncertainty of Knowledge and Previsions --
3.1.2. Knowledge of Power and Actions --
3.2. Knowledge of Intellect and Ideas (Intellect and Ideas as an Object of Knowledge) --
3.3. Knowledge of Sensitiveness and Sentiments --
3.4. Language --
3.4.1. General Concepts on Language --
3.4.1.1. What is Language? --
3.4.1.2. Language as Speech Act --
3.4.2. Analyzing Language --
3.4.2.1. Language as Expression of Knowledge --
3.4.2.1.1. Language as an Expression of Ideas and Moral Thoughts (Knowledge) about the Physical World and about Ideas and Moral Thoughts Themselves --
3.4.2.1.2. Language as an Expression of the Knowledge of Sentiments and of Moral Feelings --
3.4.2.2. Language as an Expression of Sentiments and Moral Feelings (Poetic Language, Command and Moral Language) --
ch. 4 Sensitiveness and Its Activity --
4.1. Sensitiveness as a Generator of Sentiments --
4.1.1. Sentiments and Their Objects --
4.1.2. Sentiments as Related to Ideas and Actions --
4.1.3. Judgment of Sentiments --
4.2. Expression of Sentiments and Works of Art --
4.2.1. Expression of Sentiments by Language and the Literary Arts --
4.2.1.1. Literary Arts --
4.2.1.2. Autonomy of Art --
4.2.1.3. Artistic versus Scientific Content --
4.2.1.4. Art as Expression of Universal Sentiments --
4.2.1.5. Art Critics and the Objectivity of the Value of Art --
4.2.1.6. Art and Beauty --
4.2.1.7. Representation, Expression and Understanding --
4.2.1.8. The Problem of Fiction --
4.2.1.9. Comment on the View of Art as Expression of Universal Sentiments --
4.2.2. Expression of Sentiments by Sound --
4.2.3. Expression of Sentiments by Imaging (Visual Arts) --
4.2.3.1. Painting and Sculpture --
4.2.3.2. Architecture --
4.2.3.3. Expression of Sentiments by a Combined Use of Language, Sound and Imaging (Behavior, Theater, Cinema) --
4.2.4. The Works of Art as Aesthetic Objects --
4.2.5. Art and Morality --
4.3. Comparison with Other Philosophical Conceptions of Art: Critique and Reinterpretation --
4.3.1. The Main Aesthetic Theories: An Overview --
4.3.1.1. Expressivism --
4.3.1.2. Hedonism --
4.3.1.3. Cognitivism --
4.3.1.4. Institutionalism --
4.3.1.5. Deconstruction --
4.3.1.6. Structuralism --
4.3.1.7. Representationalism --
4.3.1.8. Normative Theory of Art --
4.3.1.9. Post-Modern, Hermeneutic, and Existentialist Views on Art --
4.3.1.10. Comment --
4.3.2. The Conceptions of Art of Major Thinkers --
4.3.2.1. Pre-Kantian Conceptions: Hume's Aesthetics Note continued: 4.3.2.2. Kantian Conception --
4.3.2.2.1. Kant and the Aesthetic Judgment --
4.3.2.2.2. The Genius --
4.3.2.3. Schopenhauer on Art --
4.3.2.4. Hegel on Art --
4.3.2.5. Tolstoy on Art --
4.3.2.6. The Aesthetics of Croce and Collingwood --
4.3.2.6.1. Croce's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.6.2. Collingwood's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.7. Dewey's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.8. Art and Analytic Philosophy: Wittgenstein's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.9. Post-Modern and Hermeneutic Philosophy and the Art --
4.3.2.9.1. Lyotard's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.9.2. Heidegger's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.9.3. Gadamer's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.9.4. Vattimo's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.9.5. Sartre's Aesthetics --
4.3.2.10. Other Views on Art and Aesthetics --
4.3.3. The Definition of Art --
4.3.4. The Effects of Arts on Society --
ch. 5 Power and Its Activity: Man's Action in Society and in the Physical World --
5.1. Power as a Generator of Actions --
5.2. Actions as Related to Ideas and Sentiments --
5.3. Judgment of Actions --
5.3.1. Judgment of Actions by the Strength Criterion --
5.3.2. Judgment of Actions by the Value Criterion --
5.3.2.1. Universal Actions and The Origin of Human Society --
5.3.2.2. From the Particular Action of the Individual to the Universal Actions in Society --
5.3.2.3. Political Philosophy and the Justification of Social Institutions --
5.3.2.3.1. Correct-Rating of Actions Entails a "Power-Driven Society" --
5.3.2.3.2. Wrong-Rating of Actions Entails a "Violence-Injured Society" --
5.3.2.3.3. Spinoza's Thought and the Justification of Power --
5.3.2.3.4. The Conditions for a Meaningful Voting --
5.3.2.3.5. Social Institutions and Their Nature --
5.3.2.4. Philosophy of Law: Laws as Community-Shared Projects that Define Classes of Actions --
5.3.2.4.1. The Finality of Laws (and of the Universal Actions that They Define) and Political Parties --
5.3.2.4.2. The Nature of Laws --
5.3.2.4.3. Constitution and Constitutional Norms --
5.3.2.4.4. Adjudication --
ch. 6 The Inward/Moral Activity of Mind: Morality (or Consciousness) --
6.1. Consciousness as a Generator of Moral Events (Moral Thoughts, Moral Feelings, and Moral Acts) --
6.1.1. Moral Events --
6.1.2. Characteristics Peculiar to Moral Events --
6.1.3. Mind Evolution as the Moral Good --
6.1.3.1. Understanding the Moral Good and Morally-Good Acts --
6.1.3.2. Moral Thoughts and Moral Principles versus Moral Feelings and Moral Values --
6.1.3.3. Morally-Good and Morally-Bad States --
6.1.3.4. Distinction and Relationship between the Moral and the Selfish Mind Products (and Their Judgment Criteria) --
6.1.3.4.1. Distinction between the "Moral" and the "Selfish" Mind Activities and Products (and Their Judgment Criteria) --
6.1.3.4.2. Relationship between the Moral and the Selfish Mind Activities and Products (and Their Judgment Criteria) --
6.1.3.5. Outward versus Inward Mind Activities: Some Examples --
6.1.3.6. A Very Short Metaethical Comment --
6.1.4. Examples of Selfish/Personal Actions and Moral Acts --
6.2. Comparison with Other Theories of Consciousness --
6.2.1. Theories of Consciousness --
6.2.2. Consciousness and the Brain --
6.3. Judgment of Moral Events --
6.3.1. Judgment by the Morality Criterion --
6.3.1.1. The Morality Criterion --
6.3.1.1.1. Judgment of Moral Thoughts and Conceptions --
6.3.1.1.2. Judgment of Moral Feelings --
6.3.1.1.3. Judgment of Moral Acts --
6.3.1.2. Mention to Other Moral Conceptions --
6.3.1.3. Mind Evolution versus Other Proposed Forces that Move Mind and the World --
6.3.1.4. Demonstrative Examples: Dialogs between a "Good" Person and His Opponents --
6.3.2. Judgment by the Value Criterion --
6.3.2.1. Judging Moral Events by the Value Criterion --
6.3.2.2. Particular versus Universal Mind Products: An Overview --
6.3.3. Morality and Politics --
6.3.4. Equality as Related to Morality and Politics --
6.3.4.1. Equality between Individuals: The Right to Equal Treatment --
6.3.4.2. Inequality between Individuals: The Right to Unequal (Individualized) Treatment --
6.3.5. Supererogation, Moral Formalism, and Fanaticism --
6.4. Moral Choices and Moral Motivations --
6.4.1. Moral Choices and the Imprecision in Defining the Moral Good --
6.4.1.1. General Aspects --
6.4.1.2. Certainty and Uncertainty in Moral Choices --
6.4.1.2.1. "Moral Choices" versus "Procedural Choices" --
6.4.1.2.2. Ground "Morally-Certain" Moral Choices --
6.4.1.2.3. "Morally-Certain/Cognitively-Imprecise" Moral Choices --
6.4.1.2.4. "Cognitively-Imprecise/Predictively-Uncertain" Procedural Choices --
6.4.1.3. Moral Choices in the Private and Public (Political) Life --
6.4.1.4. Moral Motivation: A Multifactorial Conception --
6.4.1.4.1. The Internalist Position --
6.4.1.4.2. The Externalist Position --
6.4.1.4.3. Conclusion on Moral Motivation --
6.4.2. On the Weakness of the Will --
6.4.3. Defining Moral Responsibility --
6.4.4. Terminology of Mind Products and the Disappearance of the "Will" --
6.5. Free Will --
6.5.1. Freedom of Selfish Decisions and Actions and of Moral Decisions and Acts --
6.5.1.1. Freedom of Selfish/Personal Decisions and Actions --
6.5.1.2. Freedom of Moral Decisions and Moral Acts (Free Will) --
6.5.2. Choosing Between Moral Projects and Selfish/Personal Projects --
6.5.3. Comparison with Other Conceptions of Freedom --
6.5.3.1. Incompatibilist Theories --
6.5.3.2. Critical Comment --
6.5.4. Apparent Freedom Is Due to the Extreme Complexity of the Brain --
6.6. Moral Responsibility Without Freedom --
6.7. The Language of Morality (Moral Language) --
ch. 7 Analytic and Continental Philosophy: Critique and Reinterpretation --
7.1. Analytic Philosophy --
7.1.1. Russell's thought --
7.1.2. Wittgenstein's thought --
7.1.3. Quine's thought --
7.2. Continental Philosophy: Post-Modernism, Hermeneutics, Existentialism --
7.2.1. Post-Modern Philosophy --
7.2.1.1. Nietzsche and Post-Modernism --
7.2.1.2. Kuhn's Thought --
7.2.1.3. Feyerabend's Thought --
7.2.1.4. Rorty's Thought --
7.2.1.5. Lyotard --
7.2.1.6. Vattimo and Post-Modernism --
7.2.1.7. A Short Comment of Post-Modernism --
7.2.2. Hermeneutic and Existentialist Philosophy --
7.2.2.1. My Hermeneutic Theory --
7.2.2.2. Critical Reinterpretation of the Doctrines of the Main Hermeneutic Thinkers --
7.2.2.2.1. Nietzsche and Hermeneutics --
7.2.2.2.2. Peirce's Thought --
7.2.2.2.3. Heidegger's Thought --
7.2.2.2.4. Gadamer's Thought --
7.2.2.2.5. Habermas's Thought --
7.2.2.2.6. Vattimo and Hermeneutics --
7.2.2.2.7. Taylor's Thought --
7.2.2.2.8. Other --
7.2.2.3. Existentialism: Sartre's Thought --
ch. 8 Synopsis and Conclusions --
8.1. Synopsis of the Mind's Triadic Structure and Bi-directional Activity --
8.2. Synopsis of the Activities of Intellect, Sensitiveness, and Power --
8.2.1. Synopsis of the Activity of Intellect (see Fig. 8.2) --
8.2.2. Synopsis of the Activity of Sensitiveness (see Fig. 8.3) --
8.2.3. Synopsis of the Activity of Power (see Fig. 8.4) --
8.3. A Conclusive Note.
Responsibility: Francesco Belfiore.

Abstract:

The Triadic Structure of the Mind provides a philosophical system that offers fresh solutions in the fields of ontology, knowledge, ethics, and politics. The second edition includes a more extensive treatment of the topics addressed in the first edition, the introduction of new concepts, and the inclusion of additional thinkers.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.

Similar Items

Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


Primary Entity

<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/881416749> # The triadic structure of the mind : outlines of a philosophical system
    a schema:CreativeWork, schema:MediaObject, schema:Book ;
    library:oclcnum "881416749" ;
    library:placeOfPublication <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Place/lanham> ; # Lanham
    library:placeOfPublication <http://id.loc.gov/vocabulary/countries/mdu> ;
    schema:about <http://dewey.info/class/128.2/e23/> ;
    schema:about <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/classification/BD418> ;
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Topic/philosophy_of_mind> ; # Philosophy of mind
    schema:about <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Topic/philosophy_movements_humanism> ; # PHILOSOPHY--Movements--Humanism
    schema:bookEdition "2nd ed." ;
    schema:bookFormat schema:EBook ;
    schema:copyrightYear "2014" ;
    schema:creator <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Person/belfiore_francesco> ; # Francesco Belfiore
    schema:datePublished "2014" ;
    schema:description "The Triadic Structure of the Mind provides a philosophical system that offers fresh solutions in the fields of ontology, knowledge, ethics, and politics. The second edition includes a more extensive treatment of the topics addressed in the first edition, the introduction of new concepts, and the inclusion of additional thinkers."@en ;
    schema:exampleOfWork <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/3860051617> ;
    schema:genre "Electronic books"@en ;
    schema:inLanguage "en" ;
    schema:isSimilarTo <http://worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#CreativeWork/triadic_structure_of_the_mind> ;
    schema:name "The triadic structure of the mind : outlines of a philosophical system"@en ;
    schema:productID "881416749" ;
    schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/881416749#PublicationEvent/lanham_university_press_of_america_2014> ;
    schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Agent/university_press_of_america> ; # University Press of America
    schema:url <http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&scope=site&db=nlebk&db=nlabk&AN=790375> ;
    schema:url <http://site.ebrary.com/id/10878910> ;
    schema:url <http://www.AUT.eblib.com.au/EBLWeb/patron/?target=patron&extendedid=P_1704872_0> ;
    schema:url <http://public.eblib.com/choice/publicfullrecord.aspx?p=1704872> ;
    schema:workExample <http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780761863670> ;
    wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/881416749> ;
    .


Related Entities

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Agent/university_press_of_america> # University Press of America
    a bgn:Agent ;
    schema:name "University Press of America" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Person/belfiore_francesco> # Francesco Belfiore
    a schema:Person ;
    schema:familyName "Belfiore" ;
    schema:givenName "Francesco" ;
    schema:name "Francesco Belfiore" ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Topic/philosophy_movements_humanism> # PHILOSOPHY--Movements--Humanism
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "PHILOSOPHY--Movements--Humanism"@en ;
    .

<http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#Topic/philosophy_of_mind> # Philosophy of mind
    a schema:Intangible ;
    schema:name "Philosophy of mind"@en ;
    .

<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/data/3860051617#CreativeWork/triadic_structure_of_the_mind>
    a schema:CreativeWork ;
    rdfs:label "Triadic Structure of the Mind." ;
    schema:description "Print version:" ;
    schema:isSimilarTo <http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/881416749> ; # The triadic structure of the mind : outlines of a philosophical system
    .

<http://worldcat.org/isbn/9780761863670>
    a schema:ProductModel ;
    schema:isbn "0761863672" ;
    schema:isbn "9780761863670" ;
    .

<http://www.AUT.eblib.com.au/EBLWeb/patron/?target=patron&extendedid=P_1704872_0>
    rdfs:comment "Click here to access this resource online" ;
    .


Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.