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The trouble with resurrection : from Paul to the Fourth Gospel

Autor: Bernard Brandon Scott
Editorial: Salem, Or. : Polebridge Press, ©2010.
Edición/Formato:   Libro : Inglés (eng)Ver todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
The term "resurrection" has come to stand for what Christianity is all about. But a close look reveals that it should not be understood monolithically, but rather as a pluralistic and diverse phenomenon. Early Christian communities were convinced that Rome had not defeated Jesus when they crucified him. They employed a whole host of metaphors to express that conviction. The use of the single term "resurrection" to  Leer más
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Detalles

Persona designada: Jesus Christ
Tipo de documento: Libro/Texto
Todos autores / colaboradores: Bernard Brandon Scott
ISBN: 9781598150209 1598150200
Número OCLC: 663459386
Descripción: xi, 251 p. ; 23 cm.
Contenido: Introduction: the problem with resurrection ----
1. The first reference ---
2. After death in ancient Israel ---
3. Awakening from the dead ---
4. The dead in the anointed will rise first ---
5. An experience of Jesus raised from the dead ---
6. The earliest resurrection narrative? ---
7. The list ---
8. He has been seen ---
9. With what kind of body? ---
10. Assumption ---
11. Empty tomb ---
12. Mathew and Lukeʹs take on Mark ---
13. The empty tomb, again ---
14. Mary Magdalene, first? ---
15. What happened? ----
Postscript: reclaiming resurrection.
Responsabilidad: Bernard Brandon Scott.

Resumen:

The term "resurrection" has come to stand for what Christianity is all about. But a close look reveals that it should not be understood monolithically, but rather as a pluralistic and diverse phenomenon. Early Christian communities were convinced that Rome had not defeated Jesus when they crucified him. They employed a whole host of metaphors to express that conviction. The use of the single term "resurrection" to cover the phenomenon is a mistake-one that has tyrannized Christianity. Furthermore, most Christians believe in a physical resurrection, although Paul clearly calls this into question. Once that tradition became fixed, it provided the lens through which everything else was viewed-and distorted. The purpose of this book is not to say whether Jesus arose from the grave on the third day, or whether such an event is impossible. Rather, by examining the so-called resurrection stories in chronological order, it aspires to prompt readers to consider questions such as: a- what does the New Testament really say about the resurrection; b- what is the influence of Judaism on Christian belief in the resurrection; c- how did the resurrection become the central belief in Christianity; d- why did early Christians choose to believe in the resurrection; and e- and why is resurrection not the right word.

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