skip to content
Turing's cathedral : the origins of the digital universe Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

Turing's cathedral : the origins of the digital universe

Author: George Dyson
Publisher: New York : Vintage Books, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In this revealing account of how the digital universe exploded in the aftermath of World War II, George Dyson illuminates the nature of digital computers, the lives of those who brought them into existence, and how code took over the world. In the 1940s and '50s, a small group of men and women - led by John von Neumann - gathered in Princeton, New Jersey, to begin building one of the first computers to realize Alan  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Named Person: John Von Neumann; Alan Mathison Turing
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: George Dyson
ISBN: 9781400075997 1400075998
OCLC Number: 781683394
Description: xxii, 401 p., [32] p. of plates : ill., map ; 21 cm.
Contents: 1953 --
Olden farm --
Veblen's circle --
Neumann Janos --
MANIAC --
Fuld 219 --
6J6 --
V-40 --
Cyclogenesis --
Monte Carlo --
Ulam's demons --
Barricelli's universe --
Turing's cathedral --
Engineer's dreams --
Theory of self-reproducing automata --
Mach 9 --
The tale of the big computer --
The thirty-ninth step.
Responsibility: George Dyson.

Abstract:

In this revealing account of how the digital universe exploded in the aftermath of World War II, George Dyson illuminates the nature of digital computers, the lives of those who brought them into existence, and how code took over the world. In the 1940s and '50s, a small group of men and women - led by John von Neumann - gathered in Princeton, New Jersey, to begin building one of the first computers to realize Alan Turing's vision of a Universal Machine. The codes unleashed within the embryonic, 5-kilobyte universe - less memory than is allocated to displaying a single icon on a computer screen today - broke the distinction between numbers that mean things and numbers that do things, and our universe would never be the same. Turing's Cathedral is the story of how the most constructive and most destructive of twentieth-century inventions - the digital computer and the hydrogen bomb - emerged at the same time.

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/781683394>
library:oclcnum"781683394"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/781683394>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2012"
schema:description"1953 -- Olden farm -- Veblen's circle -- Neumann Janos -- MANIAC -- Fuld 219 -- 6J6 -- V-40 -- Cyclogenesis -- Monte Carlo -- Ulam's demons -- Barricelli's universe -- Turing's cathedral -- Engineer's dreams -- Theory of self-reproducing automata -- Mach 9 -- The tale of the big computer -- The thirty-ninth step."@en
schema:description"In this revealing account of how the digital universe exploded in the aftermath of World War II, George Dyson illuminates the nature of digital computers, the lives of those who brought them into existence, and how code took over the world. In the 1940s and '50s, a small group of men and women - led by John von Neumann - gathered in Princeton, New Jersey, to begin building one of the first computers to realize Alan Turing's vision of a Universal Machine. The codes unleashed within the embryonic, 5-kilobyte universe - less memory than is allocated to displaying a single icon on a computer screen today - broke the distinction between numbers that mean things and numbers that do things, and our universe would never be the same. Turing's Cathedral is the story of how the most constructive and most destructive of twentieth-century inventions - the digital computer and the hydrogen bomb - emerged at the same time."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1043467567>
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"Turing's cathedral : the origins of the digital universe"@en
schema:numberOfPages"401"
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.