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The two-headed boy, and other medical marvels

Author: Jan Bondeson
Publisher: Ithaca, N.Y. : Cornell University Press, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"A successor to his book A Cabinet of Medical Curiosities, this new collection of essays by Jan Bondeson illustrates various anomalies of human development, the lives of the remarkable individuals concerned, and social reactions to their extraordinary bodies." "Bondeson examines historical cases of dwarfism, extreme corpulence, giantism, conjoined twins, dicephaly, and extreme hairiness; his broader theme, however,  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jan Bondeson
ISBN: 0801437679 9780801437670 080148958X 9780801489587
OCLC Number: 43296582
Description: xxii, 295 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Two inseparable brothers; and a preface --
Hairy maid at the harpsichord --
Stone-child --
Woman who laid an egg --
Strangest miracle in the world --
Some words about hog-faced gentlewomen --
Horned humans --
Biddenden maids --
Tocci brothers, and other dicephali --
King of Poland's court dwarf --
Daniel Cajanus, the Swedish giant --
Daniel Lambert, the human colossus --
Cat-eating Englishmen and French frog swallowers.
Responsibility: Jan Bondeson.

Abstract:

"A successor to his book A Cabinet of Medical Curiosities, this new collection of essays by Jan Bondeson illustrates various anomalies of human development, the lives of the remarkable individuals concerned, and social reactions to their extraordinary bodies." "Bondeson examines historical cases of dwarfism, extreme corpulence, giantism, conjoined twins, dicephaly, and extreme hairiness; his broader theme, however, is the infinite range of human experience. The dicephalous Tocci brothers and Lazarus Colloredo (from whose belly grew his malformed conjoined twin), the Swedish giant, and the king of Poland's dwarf - Bondeson considers these individuals not as "freaks" but as human beings born with sometimes appalling congenital deformities. He makes full use of original French, German, Dutch, Polish, and Scandinavian sources and explores elements of ethnology, literature, and cultural history in his diagnoses."--BOOK JACKET.

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