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Two kingdoms, two loyalties : Mennonite pacifism in modern America

Author: Perry Bush
Publisher: Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
For more than 300 years, Mennonites adhered to a strict two-kingdom theology, owing their supreme allegiance to the divine kingdom while serving as loyal, law-abiding subjects of the state in all matters that did not contradict their religious beliefs. Traditionally, Mennonites saw affairs of state as none of their business. In times of war, the Mennonite church counseled conscientious objection and spoke against
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Bush, Perry.
Two kingdoms, two loyalties.
Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998
(OCoLC)607062855
Online version:
Bush, Perry.
Two kingdoms, two loyalties.
Baltimore, Md. : Johns Hopkins University Press, 1998
(OCoLC)608667117
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Perry Bush
ISBN: 0801858275 9780801858277
OCLC Number: 38107133
Notes: Based on the author's thesis (doctoral)--Carnegie Mellon University.
Description: xii, 362 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: 1. Introduction: Two Kingdoms, Two Loyalties 2. Challenges to Mennonite Peacemaking, 1914 1939 3. The Mennonite Leadership and a Line of Least Resistance 4. The Mennonite People and Total War, 1941 1945 5. The Decline and Revival of the Mennonite Community 6. New Directions and Forms of Witness, 1946 1956 7. Speaking to the State, 1957 1965 8. Draft Resistance, Nonresistance, and Vietnam, 1965 1973 9. Transformed Landscape, Transformed Voices.
Responsibility: Perry Bush.
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Abstract:

For more than 300 years, Mennonites adhered to a strict two-kingdom theology, owing their supreme allegiance to the divine kingdom while serving as loyal, law-abiding subjects of the state in all matters that did not contradict their religious beliefs. Traditionally, Mennonites saw affairs of state as none of their business. In times of war, the Mennonite church counseled conscientious objection and spoke against military participation in either combatant or noncombatant roles. Mennonites did not serve in coercive government offices. Most refused to vote or sue in courts of law and held a generally negative view of active political protest.

During World War II, however, the voluntary participation of Mennonites in conscientious objector labor camps pulled Mennonite youth out of rural isolation and raised their awareness of America's social ills and their own responsibilities as Christians. In the postwar era, Mennonites were no longer "the quiet in the land"; they began to articulate publicly their concerns about such issues as the draft, the civil rights movement, and the Vietnam War. In Two Kingdoms, Two Loyalties, Perry Bush explores the dramatic changes both within Mennonite communities and in their relationship to mainstream American society between the 1920s and the 1970s, as Mennonite society and culture underwent a profound transformation from seclusion to nearly complete acculturation.

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