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Ulysses, capitalism and colonialism : reading Joyce after the Cold War

Author: M Keith Booker
Publisher: Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2000.
Series: Contributions to the study of world literature, no. 98.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The work of James Joyce, especially Ulysses, can be fully understood only when the colonial and postcolonial context of Joyce's Ireland is taken into account. Reading Joyce as a postcolonial writer produces valuable new insights into his work, though comparisons of Joyce's work with that of African and Caribbean postcolonial writers provides reminders that Joyce, regardless of his postcolonial status, remains a  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
History
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Booker, M. Keith.
Ulysses, capitalism and colonialism.
Westport, Conn. : Greenwood Press, 2000
(DLC) 99043505
(OCoLC)42290290
Named Person: James Joyce; James Joyce; James Joyce; James Joyce
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: M Keith Booker
ISBN: 9780313030581 0313030588
OCLC Number: 631270081
Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. [S.l.] : HathiTrust Digital Library, 2010. MiAaHDL
Description: 1 online resource (230 pages).
Details: Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Contents: Introduction: How Joyce Became a Postcolonial Writer; 1. Joyce among the Marxists, or, The Cultural Politics of Joyce Criticism; 2. "Intercourse Had Been Incomplete": Commodification and the Reification of Social Relations in Ulysses; 3. "Bronze by Gold, Steelyringing": Fragmentation, the "Sirens" Prologue, and the Politics of Style in Ulysses; 4. "Khaki Hamlets Don't Hesitate": Ulysses, the Boer War, and British Imperialism; 5. "History Is to Blame": Ulysses, Lukács, and the Historical Novel; 6. "That Can Be Explained": Bloom, Science, and the Postcolonial Bourgeoisie.
Series Title: Contributions to the study of world literature, no. 98.
Responsibility: M. Keith Booker.

Abstract:

The work of James Joyce, especially Ulysses, can be fully understood only when the colonial and postcolonial context of Joyce's Ireland is taken into account. Reading Joyce as a postcolonial writer produces valuable new insights into his work, though comparisons of Joyce's work with that of African and Caribbean postcolonial writers provides reminders that Joyce, regardless of his postcolonial status, remains a fundamentally European writer whose perspective differs substantially from that of most other postcolonial writers. In addition to exploring Joyce's writings in light of recent developm.

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