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Uncentering the Earth : Copernicus and the revolutions of the heavenly spheres

Autore: William T Vollmann
Editore: New York : Norton, ©2006.
Serie: Great discoveries.
Edizione/Formato:   Libro : Biography : English : 1st edVedi tutte le edizioni e i formati
Banca dati:WorldCat
Sommario:
An analysis of the astronomer's pivotal sixteenth-century work traces how his challenge to beliefs about an Earth-centric solar system had a profound influence on the ways in which humanity understands itself and the universe.
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Dettagli

Genere/forma: Early works
Early works to 1800
Persona incaricata: Nicolaus Copernicus; Nicolaus Copernicus; Nikolaus Kopernikus; Nikolaus Kopernikus; Nicolaus Copernicus
Tipo materiale: Biography, Risorsa internet
Tipo documento: Book, Internet Resource
Tutti gli autori / Collaboratori: William T Vollmann
ISBN: 0393059693 9780393059694
Numero OCLC: 61479556
Note: "Atlas books."
Descrizione: 295 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.
Contenuti: Why the universe screams --
Exegesis : Osiander's preface and I.1-4 --
Once upon a time, beneath an unspotted sun --
Provenance of the preface --
Rev. I.1 : what ought to be must be --
Spherical finitude --
I.2 : the spherical Earth --
Starry proofs --
I.3 : proportioning water on the Earth --
I.4 : eternal circles, circles around circles --
The ecliptic and the Zodiac --
The equinoxes --
Ecliptic wriggles --
A complaint against contrary movements --
I.4 (cont'd) : "we must however confess that the movements are circular" --
On guard --
What we believed : cosmology --
Centeredness as inevitability --
Twelve impieties --
Ptolemy's justifications --
Polish courtyards --
The dead hand --
Epicycles --
Diagram of a water-mill --
Equants --
The parable of the Alphonsine tables --
One thing with many effects --
Exegesis : I.5 --
What we believed : motion --
Earth's appropriate position --
Natural versus compulsory motion --
Willed perfection --
"Circular movement belongs to wholes and rectilinear to parts" --
Stillness --
Exegesis : I.5 (cont'd)-I.9 --
I.5 : "does the Earth have a circular movement?" --
I.6 : the geometry of heavenly immensity --
1.7-9 : Copernicus almost defines gravity --
A digression on Neptune's atmosphere --
A sub-digression on the Coriolis effect --
"Then what should we say about the clouds?" --
I.9 : centering the sun --
The limits of observation in 1543 --
How easy it used to be to save the appearances! --
Foucault's pendulum --
"Bequeathed like a legacy" --
"Binoculars are usually needed" --
Exegesis : I.10-14 --
I.10 : simplifying and rearranging the heavenly spheres --
I.11 : the Earth's three movements --
I.12-14 : some theorems of plane and spherical geometry --
Orbits of Venus --
"In line with the Water-Bearer's testicles" --
Parallax --
Another perfect circle --
"Then what will they say is contained in all this space?" --
"An easier and more convenient demonstration" --
"More complicated than the Ptolemaic system" --
"But now the telescope manifestly shows these horns" --
Exegesis : Book II --
II.1-2 : uncentering definitions --
II.3-14 : tables and transformations --
What we believed : scriptures --
The parable of the lodestone --
Exempt from re-examination --
The status of the sun when Lot came to Zo'ar --
"Aided by spiritual insight" --
Twenty-four centuries since creation --
Axioms of scriptural astronomy --
The leaden square --
"The sun did run much more than 7,000 miles" --
Exegesis : Book III --
III.1-3 : Spica's variables --
III.3-4 : the lost ellipse --
III.5-26 : eccentrics, epicycles and an uncentered Earth --
Silent to the end --
"A pale, insignificant figure" --
Postludes to an occultation --
Fish days and meat days in Gynopolis --
"Nobody shall have any proper pretext to suspect evil of me hereafter" --
Safe at last --
Exegesis : Book IV --
IV.2-4 : "I say that the lunar appearances agree" --
IV.4-32 : distances, diameters, volumes --
The Pillars of Hercules --
"I doubt not that certain savants have taken great offense" --
To the Eighth Circle --
Herschel's looming universe --
Exegesis : Book V --
V.1-5 : the Martian circles --
V.4-36 : rescuing Mercury from injury and disparagement --
Assessments --
"Rotting in a coffer" --
False supposition, true demonstration --
Exegesis : Book VI --
VI.1-8 : inclination, obliquation, deviation --
VI.9 : "except that in the case of Mercury ..." --
Simplicity --
Astrologers' shameful recourse --
Epilogue to Mercury's obliquation --
Back to iron-grubbing --
But the universe screamed --
Burnings --
The Medicean planets --
Resolutely Copernican --
"How great would have been thy joy" --
"Newly emerging values still seeking intellectual justification" --
"Safely back on a solid Earth" --
Chronology --
Glossary.
Titolo della serie: Great discoveries.
Responsabilità: William T. Vollmann.
Maggiori informazioni:

Abstract:

As contemporary cosmologists explore the universe's vastness and the nearly insignificant role mankind plays in it, the repercussions from Copernicus's radical views continue to resound. The author  Per saperne di più…

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