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Understanding John Dewey : nature and cooperative intelligence

Author: James Campbell
Publisher: Chicago, Ill. : Open Court, ©1995.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Dewey is the most influential of American social thinkers, and his stock is now rising once more among professional philosophers. Yet there has heretofore been no adequate, readable survey of the full range of Dewey's thought. After an introduction situating Dewey in the context of American social and intellectual history, Professor Campbell devotes Part I to Dewey's general philosophical perspective as it considers
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Campbell, James, 1948-
Understanding John Dewey.
Chicago, Ill. : Open Court, ©1995
(OCoLC)624462923
Named Person: John Dewey; John Dewey; John Dewey
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James Campbell
ISBN: 0812692845 9780812692846 0812692853 9780812692853
OCLC Number: 31971754
Description: xii, 310 pages ; 24 cm
Contents: Ch. 1. Introduction --
Ch. 2. Human Nature --
Ch. 3. Experience, Nature, and the Role of Philosophy --
Ch. 4. Designating the Good --
Ch. 5. Building a Better Society --
Ch. 6. Criticisms and Responses --
Ch. 7. Human Community as a Religious Goal.
Other Titles: John Dewey
Responsibility: James Campbell.

Abstract:

Dewey is the most influential of American social thinkers, and his stock is now rising once more among professional philosophers. Yet there has heretofore been no adequate, readable survey of the full range of Dewey's thought. After an introduction situating Dewey in the context of American social and intellectual history, Professor Campbell devotes Part I to Dewey's general philosophical perspective as it considers humans and their natural home. Three aspects of human nature are most prominent in Dewey's thinking: humans as evolutionary emergents, as essentially social beings, and as problem solvers.

Part II examines Dewey's social vision, taking his ethical views as the starting point. Underlying all of Dewey's efforts at social reconstruction are certain assumptions about cooperative enquiry as a social method, assumptions which Campbell explains and clarifies before evaluating various criticisms of Dewey's ideas. The final chapter discusses Dewey's views on religion.

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