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Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson. Part 1.

Author: Ken Burns; Kanopy (Firm)
Publisher: [San Francisco, California, USA] : Kanopy Streaming, 2016.
Edition/Format:   eVideo : Clipart/images/graphics : English
Summary:
'Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson - Part 1' is part of a series of films from PBS. Jack Johnson - the first African-American Heavyweight Champion of the World, whose dominance over his white opponents spurred furious debates and race riots in the early 20th century - enters the ring once again in January 2005 when PBS airs Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson, a  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Clipart/images/graphics, Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File, Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: Ken Burns; Kanopy (Firm)
OCLC Number: 956904791
Language Note: In English.
Notes: Playing time: 108 min.
In Process Record.
Title from title frames.
Event notes: Originally produced by PBS in 2005.
Description: 1 online resource (1 video file, approximately 111 min.)

Abstract:

'Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson - Part 1' is part of a series of films from PBS. Jack Johnson - the first African-American Heavyweight Champion of the World, whose dominance over his white opponents spurred furious debates and race riots in the early 20th century - enters the ring once again in January 2005 when PBS airs Unforgivable Blackness: The Rise and Fall of Jack Johnson, a provocative new PBS documentary by acclaimed filmmaker Ken Burns. The two-part film airs on PBS Monday-Tuesday January 17-18, 2005, 9:00-11:00 p.m. ET (check local listings). Burns, whose past films on PBS (The Civil War, Baseball, JAZZ, etc.) are among the most-watched documentaries ever made, shows the gritty details of Johnson's life through archival footage, still photographs, and the commentary of boxing experts such as Stanley Crouch, Bert Sugar, the late George Plimpton, Jack Newfield, Randy Roberts, Gerald Early and James Earl Jones, who portrayed Johnson in the Broadway play and film based on Johnson's life, "The Great White Hope." "Johnson in many ways is an embodiment of the African-American struggle to be truly free in this country - economically, socially and politically," said Burns. "He absolutely refused to play by the rules set by the white establishment, or even those of the black community. In that sense, he fought for freedom not just as a black man, but as an individual." Johnson, who was born in 1878 in Galveston, Texas, began boxing as a young teenager in the Jim Crow-era South. Boxing was a relatively new sport in America, and was banned in many states. African-Americans were permitted to compete for most titles, but not for the title that whites considered their exclusive domain: Heavyweight Champion of the World. African-Americans were considered unworthy to compete for the title - not for lack of talent, but simply by virtue of not being white. Despite this, Johnson was persistent in challenging James J. Jeffries - the heavyweight champion at the time, who was considered by many to be the greatest heavyweight in history - for a shot at the title. For 14 years, Johnson had made a name for himself as well as a considerable amount of money with his ability to beat black and white opponents with shocking ease. Jeffries, however, refused to fight a black boxer and instead decided to retire undefeated. Then in 1908, after defeating most other white opponents, the new champion Tommy Burns agreed to fight Johnson in Australia for the unheard of sum of

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