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The unheard : a memoir of deafness and Africa

Author: Josh Swiller
Publisher: Princeton, N.J. : Recording for the Blind & Dyslexic, 2007.
Series: A Holt paperback
Edition/Format:   Audiobook on CD : CD audio : Biography : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
These are hearing aids. They take the sounds of the world and amplify them. [The author] recited this speech to himself on the day he arrived in Mununga, a dusty village on the shores of Lake Mweru. Deaf since a young age, [the author] spent his formative years in frustrated limbo on the sidelines of the hearing world, encouraged by his family to use lipreading and the strident approximations of hearing aids to  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Biography
Named Person: Josh Swiller; Josh Swiller
Material Type: Biography, Audio book, etc.
Document Type: Sound Recording
All Authors / Contributors: Josh Swiller
OCLC Number: 182524138
Notes: Originally published: New York : Henry Holt and Co., 2007. 1st Holt paperbacks ed.
Description: Sound disc : digital, mono. ; 4 3/4 in.
Series Title: A Holt paperback
Responsibility: Josh Swiller.

Abstract:

These are hearing aids. They take the sounds of the world and amplify them. [The author] recited this speech to himself on the day he arrived in Mununga, a dusty village on the shores of Lake Mweru. Deaf since a young age, [the author] spent his formative years in frustrated limbo on the sidelines of the hearing world, encouraged by his family to use lipreading and the strident approximations of hearing aids to blend in. It didn't work. So he decided to ditch the well-trodden path after college, setting out to find a place so far removed that his deafness would become irrelevant. That place turned out to be Zambia, where [he] worked as a Peace Corps volunteer for two years. There he would encounter a world where violence, disease, and poverty were the mundane facts of life. But despite the culture shock, [he] finally commanded attention - everyone always listened carefully to the white man, even if they didn't always follow his instruction. Spending his days working in the health clinic with Augustine Jere, a chubby, world-weary chess aficionado and a steadfast friend, [the author] had finally found, he believed, a place where his deafness didn't interfere, a place he could call home. Until, that is, a nightmarish incident blasted away his newfound convictions. -Back cover.

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