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The union makes us strong : radical unionism on the San Francisco waterfront

Author: David T Wellman
Publisher: Cambridge [England] ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1995.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Based on three years of ethnographic research, this book takes a close look at one of the CIO unions that did not move from craft to business unionism: the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union's (ILWU) major longshore local (Local 10, San Francisco). American unionism looks quite different than conventional scholarly wisdom suggests when actual union practices are observed. One finds that in the  Read more...
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Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: David T Wellman
ISBN: 0521450055 9780521450058
OCLC Number: 30072437
Description: xix, 364 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Contents: pt. I. Labor Radicalism Revisited. 1. Unsettling old scores: Labor radicalism encounters conventional wisdom. 2. Sealing the fate of radical labor theoretically. 3. A framework for American unionism --
pt. II. Local Community and "Tumultuous" Democracy: The Sociocultural Foundations of Unionism on the San Francisco Waterfront. 4. Political community on the San Francisco waterfront. 5. The structure of participationist politics. 6. Being political in Local 10 --
pt. III. Unionism, Work, and Technological Change. 7. Work, knowledge, and control: Conventional longshoring. 8. Work, knowledge, and control: Containerized longshoring. 9. "Doing the right thing": Working principles and codes of conduct --
pt. IV. Waging the Battle for Workplace Control on Contractual Terrain. 10. Who decides how to work? 11. Which side's language shall govern? 12. By whose principles will merit be rewarded? --
pt. V. Agreeing to Disagree: Being Defensibly Disobedient.
Responsibility: David Wellman.
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Abstract:

Based on three years of ethnographic research, this book takes a close look at one of the CIO unions that did not move from craft to business unionism: the International Longshoremen's and Warehousemen's Union's (ILWU) major longshore local (Local 10, San Francisco). American unionism looks quite different than conventional scholarly wisdom suggests when actual union practices are observed. One finds that in the ILWU, resistance to management's authority is collectively legitimated behavior, and explicitly acknowledged as good trade unionism. This case study suggests that American labor's trajectory is neither inevitable nor determined; that militant, democratic forms of unionism are possible in the United States; and that collective bargaining need not eliminate contests for control over the workplace. Under certain conditions, the contract is a bargain that reflects and reproduces fundamental disagreement; it is a document that states how production and conflict will proceed.

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