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The use and abuse of vegetational concepts : rcology, technology, and society-all watched over by machines of loving grace

Author: BBC Worldwide Ltd.; Films for the Humanities & Sciences (Firm); Films Media Group.
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : Films Media Group, [2012], ©2011.
Series: All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace.
Edition/Format:   eVideo : Clipart/images/graphics : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The balance of nature" is a widely-held belief that ecosystems function cooperatively rather than hierarchically, gradually adjusting for change - a concept that was co-opted by early computer scientists and hippies alike. This program examines that concept and how its mechanistic but egalitarian philosophy came to permeate the zeitgeist of the mid-20th century, only to be debunked later on as history proceeded to  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Educational films
Internet videos
Videorecording
History
Additional Physical Format: Originally produced:
BBC Worldwide Ltd., 2011.
Material Type: Clipart/images/graphics, Internet resource, Videorecording
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File, Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: BBC Worldwide Ltd.; Films for the Humanities & Sciences (Firm); Films Media Group.
OCLC Number: 802298196
Notes: Films on Demand is distributed by Films Media Group for Films for the Humanities & Sciences, Cambridge Educational, Meridian Education, and Shopware.
Encoded with permission for digital streaming by Films Media Group on February 01, 2012.
Target Audience: 9 & up.
Description: 1 streaming video file (52 min.) : sd., col., digital file.
Contents: Self-Organizing Networks (2:23) --
Brain as Machine (1:41) --
Ecosystems (2:03) --
System Dynamics (2:29) --
Man-Machine System (1:43) --
Cybernetics and Ecosystems (2:20) --
Misuse of Data (0:45) --
Disappearance of Biology (1:16) --
Buckminster Fuller (2:16) --
Operating Manual for Spaceship Earth (1:52) --
Rise of the Counterculture (1:01) --
Counterculture Communes (1:34) --
Communes: Group Stabilization (1:26) --
Personal Computers (2:57) --
World as Cybernetic System (2:12) --
Politics and World Collapse (1:49) --
Holism and British Empire (2:27) --
Web of Life (1:40) --
Ecological Beliefs Upset (1:28) --
Fluctuations in Nature (1:24) --
History of Ecosystems (3:59) --
Illusion of Balance of Nature (2:25) --
Self-Organizing Network (1:47) --
Dream of the Sixties (1:48) --
Power and Failure (2:43) --
Limitations of the Self-Organizing Model (1:32) --
Credits: The Use and Abuse of Vegetational Concepts: Ecology, Technology, and Society-All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace (0:47)
Series Title: All Watched Over by Machines of Loving Grace.
Other Titles: All watched over by machines of loving grace
Ecology, technology, and society
Responsibility: BBC Worldwide Ltd.

Abstract:

"The balance of nature" is a widely-held belief that ecosystems function cooperatively rather than hierarchically, gradually adjusting for change - a concept that was co-opted by early computer scientists and hippies alike. This program examines that concept and how its mechanistic but egalitarian philosophy came to permeate the zeitgeist of the mid-20th century, only to be debunked later on as history proceeded to show that systems without leaders have a tendency to fail. The video features commentary from influential systems scientist Jay Forrester; footage of Buckminster Fuller, who popularized eco-cybernetic concepts; and former commune members discussing the limitations of applying computer theory to interpersonal behavior.

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Linked Data


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