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Vehicle detection. Phase II, MGVD development

Author: D O Wick; Roger A Lubke; N G Hedtke; Honeywell Inc.; United States. Federal Highway Administration.
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Federal Highway Administration, Office of Research and Development ; Springfield, Va. : Available through the National Technical Information Service, 1975.
Edition/Format:   Book : National government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The FHWA vehicle detector concept called the Magnetic Gradient Vehicle Detector (MGVD) was examined by this project. The MGVD consists of an electro-magnetic transducer in the pavement, interconnecting wiring, and transmitter/receiver electronics in the traffic control enclosure. The transmitter electronics energizes a transmitter coil at one end of the transducer. The resulting field is loosely coupled into a null  Read more...
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Details

Material Type: Government publication, National government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: D O Wick; Roger A Lubke; N G Hedtke; Honeywell Inc.; United States. Federal Highway Administration.
OCLC Number: 1674952
Notes: "Report No. FHWA-RD-75-19."
PB 244 135/AS.
U.S. Federal Highway Administration R & D report no. T 0116.
Report date January 1975.
Description: v, 118 pages : illustrations (some folded) ; 27 cm.
Responsibility: D.O. Wick, R.A. Lubke, and N.G. Hedtke.

Abstract:

The FHWA vehicle detector concept called the Magnetic Gradient Vehicle Detector (MGVD) was examined by this project. The MGVD consists of an electro-magnetic transducer in the pavement, interconnecting wiring, and transmitter/receiver electronics in the traffic control enclosure. The transmitter electronics energizes a transmitter coil at one end of the transducer. The resulting field is loosely coupled into a null coil near the transmitter coil and at a receiver coil situated at the opposite end of the transducer. The null coil and receiver coil are wired in phase opposition such that their output is nulled. A vehicle passing over the transducer varies the electromagnetic field resulting in both an amplitude and phase variation to the receiver coil output which is detected by the receiver electronics. Since the MGVD transducer is approximately 1/2 inch wide, 2 inches deep, and 84 inches long, it is simpler to install than the inductive loop and could be a cost-effective alternative to the inductive loop detector.

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