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Venture once more; a novel of Cornwall, 1790-1791.

Author: Winston Graham
Publisher: Garden City, Doubleday, 1954 [©1950]
Edition/Format:   Print book : Fiction : English : [1st ed.]View all editions and formats
Summary:
Third in the series which began with The Renegade and Demelza, this continues but does not necessarily conclude the history of the Poldarks, and particularly Ross and Demelza. The year is 1790, and much of the insurgent restlessness of the times is manifest in Ross, an uncertain and, to some extent, alien figure. He now faces trial at the assizes for the rioting and assault with which the last book ended; his small  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Fiction
Historical fiction
Material Type: Fiction
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Winston Graham
OCLC Number: 1674057
Description: 283 pages 22 cm
Contents: Book one. In August 1790 three men rode along the mule track past Grambler Mine and made towards the straggling cottages at the end of the village --
The morning was well gone when Demelza turned Caerhays towards dinner and home --
Ross road in to Truro on the following Monday --
When Francis got home it was just after six --
Bodmin at the time of the summer assizes of 1790 was a town with 3,000 inhabitants and 29 public houses --
There was no moon to light the town that night, but every shop, tavern and house contributed its share to the yellow flicker of the streets --
On Sunday morning there was a procession to church, headed by the legal fraternity in the town --
Verity sat on the low window seat watching the 40 or 50 horses being driven by the hotel grooms down from the grazing fields above the town --
After dark the streets reached their peak of noise and drunkenness, and Dwight's first intention was not to go out again --
Before the Reformation the Franciscans had been a power in the town, owning much of the property at its heart --
While the next witnesses were making their procession to and from the box Verity watched the jury --
It was now or never --
They went home that same evening --
Later that night a coach drew up outside the largest of the town houses in Princes Street, Truro, and a chilled and yawning postilion got down to open the carriage door for George Warleggan --
Book two. As the autumn lengthened and winter came in Ross made a determined effort to set aside the troubles and anxieties that were past and accept in earnest the life of a small farmer squire with a mining interest --
The following day Demelza rode a little defiantly off to meet the Bodrugans at Werry House --
The brooch fetched 70 pounds --
Penvenen land stretched up almost to the back of Grambler village --
On the last day of the old year Myners brought a message to the Gatehouse where Dwight was experimenting with certain poisons to see if in small doses they had any medicine old values --
The following week, one of the quarterly meetings of the Wheal Leisure venturers was due, and it was Mr. Treneglos's turn to entertain the others at Mingoose --
The next day Ross was up before dawn and spent the morning at the mine --
Ross's idea would not let him alone --
Widow Tregothnan's kiddley in Sawle was crammed to the doors --
Jud's send-off fitty ways began at 2 o'clock the day before the funeral --
Jud's recovery was a nine days' wonder and scandal in the district --
The sudden brawl with George Warleggan had left Ross in a ferment of angry thoughts --
On the following afternoon Verity stood at the window of her house overlooking Falmouth Harbour, listening for the arrival of the Plymouth coach --
It was just a small party at Nampara House: Francis and Elizabeth and Andrew Blamey and Verity and Dwight Enys, who was now almost one of the family.

Abstract:

Third in the series which began with The Renegade and Demelza, this continues but does not necessarily conclude the history of the Poldarks, and particularly Ross and Demelza. The year is 1790, and much of the insurgent restlessness of the times is manifest in Ross, an uncertain and, to some extent, alien figure. He now faces trial at the assizes for the rioting and assault with which the last book ended; his small daughter has died, and he is close to bankruptcy. Demelza with her charm is able to exert a little influence before the trial in which Ross undertakes his own defense and is found not guilty. But he is still bitter, and Demelza, who is carrying another child, has reason to believe it is unwanted. But his personal relationships are more reconciled, his future more assured by the close. The estrangement with his cousin, Francis, is forgotten in the partnership to open a new copper mine, and his son is born and accepted. A traditional novel which is generous in character and incident and which holds an established interest for readers of the previous books. - Kirkus Review.

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Primary Entity

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   schema:description "Book one. In August 1790 three men rode along the mule track past Grambler Mine and made towards the straggling cottages at the end of the village -- The morning was well gone when Demelza turned Caerhays towards dinner and home -- Ross road in to Truro on the following Monday -- When Francis got home it was just after six -- Bodmin at the time of the summer assizes of 1790 was a town with 3,000 inhabitants and 29 public houses -- There was no moon to light the town that night, but every shop, tavern and house contributed its share to the yellow flicker of the streets -- On Sunday morning there was a procession to church, headed by the legal fraternity in the town -- Verity sat on the low window seat watching the 40 or 50 horses being driven by the hotel grooms down from the grazing fields above the town -- After dark the streets reached their peak of noise and drunkenness, and Dwight's first intention was not to go out again -- Before the Reformation the Franciscans had been a power in the town, owning much of the property at its heart -- While the next witnesses were making their procession to and from the box Verity watched the jury -- It was now or never -- They went home that same evening -- Later that night a coach drew up outside the largest of the town houses in Princes Street, Truro, and a chilled and yawning postilion got down to open the carriage door for George Warleggan --"@en ;
   schema:description "Third in the series which began with The Renegade and Demelza, this continues but does not necessarily conclude the history of the Poldarks, and particularly Ross and Demelza. The year is 1790, and much of the insurgent restlessness of the times is manifest in Ross, an uncertain and, to some extent, alien figure. He now faces trial at the assizes for the rioting and assault with which the last book ended; his small daughter has died, and he is close to bankruptcy. Demelza with her charm is able to exert a little influence before the trial in which Ross undertakes his own defense and is found not guilty. But he is still bitter, and Demelza, who is carrying another child, has reason to believe it is unwanted. But his personal relationships are more reconciled, his future more assured by the close. The estrangement with his cousin, Francis, is forgotten in the partnership to open a new copper mine, and his son is born and accepted. A traditional novel which is generous in character and incident and which holds an established interest for readers of the previous books. - Kirkus Review."@en ;
   schema:description "Book two. As the autumn lengthened and winter came in Ross made a determined effort to set aside the troubles and anxieties that were past and accept in earnest the life of a small farmer squire with a mining interest -- The following day Demelza rode a little defiantly off to meet the Bodrugans at Werry House -- The brooch fetched 70 pounds -- Penvenen land stretched up almost to the back of Grambler village -- On the last day of the old year Myners brought a message to the Gatehouse where Dwight was experimenting with certain poisons to see if in small doses they had any medicine old values -- The following week, one of the quarterly meetings of the Wheal Leisure venturers was due, and it was Mr. Treneglos's turn to entertain the others at Mingoose -- The next day Ross was up before dawn and spent the morning at the mine -- Ross's idea would not let him alone -- Widow Tregothnan's kiddley in Sawle was crammed to the doors -- Jud's send-off fitty ways began at 2 o'clock the day before the funeral -- Jud's recovery was a nine days' wonder and scandal in the district -- The sudden brawl with George Warleggan had left Ross in a ferment of angry thoughts -- On the following afternoon Verity stood at the window of her house overlooking Falmouth Harbour, listening for the arrival of the Plymouth coach -- It was just a small party at Nampara House: Francis and Elizabeth and Andrew Blamey and Verity and Dwight Enys, who was now almost one of the family."@en ;
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<http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1330745> # England--Cornwall (County)
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