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Victorian psychology and British culture, 1850-1880

Author: Rick Rylance
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, 2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This book examines psychological theory as it appeared to the Victorians themselves, tracing the social and intellectual forces in play in its formation; it also relates these nineteenth-century ideas to twentieth-century developments in psychological investigation. Part One outlines the general debate. Part Two concentrates on three central figures: Alexander Bain, Herbert Spencer, and G. H. Lewes. It assesses  Read more...
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Genre/Form: History
Named Person: Alexander Bain; Herbert Spencer; George Henry Lewes; Alexander Bain; Herbert Spencer; George Henry Lewes; George Eliot; George Eliot; Alexander Bain; Herbert Spencer; George Henry Lewes; Alexander Bain; George Henry Lewes; Herbert Spencer
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Rick Rylance
ISBN: 0198122837 9780198122838
OCLC Number: 43903645
Description: x, 355 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: Introduction. Looking Round Corners --
Pt. 1. Generalities: A Discrimination of Types of Psychological Theory. 1. Discourse of the Soul. 2. Discourse of Philosophy. 3. Discourse of Physiology in General Biology. 4. Discourse of Medicine --
Pt. 2. Particulars: Three Writers in their Times and Contexts. 5. Alexander Bain and the New Psychology of the Higher Faculties. Bain, Mill, and the Politics of Psychological Theory in the Mid-Century. Bain and the Development of Physiological Associationism. Bain's Theory of the Will. 6. Herbert Spencer and the Beginnings of Evolutionary Psychology. Changes in Models of the Mind in the Second Half of the Nineteenth Century. Spencer's Psychology: From Associationism to Evolutionary Theory.
Responsibility: Rick Rylance.
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Abstract:

This examination of psychological theory as it appeared to the Victorians, traces the social and intellectual forces in play in its formation; it also relates these 19th-century ideas to 20th-century  Read more...

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undoubtedly useful in deepening the reader's understanding of psychology in this period Kirstie Blair, George Eliot-George Henry Lewes Studies

 
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schema:reviewBody""This book examines psychological theory as it appeared to the Victorians themselves, tracing the social and intellectual forces in play in its formation; it also relates these nineteenth-century ideas to twentieth-century developments in psychological investigation. Part One outlines the general debate. Part Two concentrates on three central figures: Alexander Bain, Herbert Spencer, and G. H. Lewes. It assesses their contributions in the context of the public debates which shaped their work. This is the first detailed study of the development of a mature body of complex interdisciplinary theory often neglected by modern commentators. It also provides one of the first thorough examinations of the work of G. H. Lewes, which has been greatly underestimated." "Distinctive features of this study include its cross-referral between work in different disciplines, and a series of analyses of the work of George Eliot, whose writing is saturated with ideas developed alongside those of the great psychologists who formed her circle."--BOOK JACKET."
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