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Victorian Yankees at Queen Victoria's court : American encounters with Victoria and Albert Titelvorschau
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Victorian Yankees at Queen Victoria's court : American encounters with Victoria and Albert

Verfasser/in: Stanley Weintraub
Verlag: Lanham, Md. : University of Delaware Press, ©2011.
Ausgabe/Format   Buch : EnglischAlle Ausgaben und Formate anzeigen
Datenbank:WorldCat
Zusammenfassung:
"Little seems to have changed since Victoria's day in the instant magnetism of British royalty across the Atlantic; yet for the first generations liberated by revolution, the British Isles and its sovereigns seemed as remote as the Moon. In the young nation, Americans who were little interested in the sons and daughters of their last king, George III, developed a love-hate relationship with Queen Victoria, his
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Name: Victoria, Queen of Great Britain; Albert, Prince Consort consort of Victoria Queen of Great Britain
Dokumenttyp: Buch
Alle Autoren: Stanley Weintraub
ISBN: 9781611490602 161149060X
OCLC-Nummer: 698327984
Beschreibung: 257 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm
Inhalt: Chapter 1 Chapter I: Republican Yankees Chapter 2 Chapter II: Coronation and After Chapter 3 Chapter III: Victoria and Albert Chapter 4 Chapter IV: Yankee Doodle Comes to Town Chapter 5 Chapter V: Seeing the Queen Chapter 6 Chapter VI: Before the Deluge Chapter 7 Chapter VII: Civil War at Home Chapter 8 Chapter VIII: An End to Seclusion Chapter 9 Chapter IX: Guest Tales Chapter 10 Chapter X: "Grandmother England" Chapter 11 Chapter XI: Command Performances Chapter 12 Chapter XII: Jubilee Encore Chapter 13 Chapter XIII: Last Encounters Chapter 14 Afterword: Caisson for a Queen
Verfasserangabe: Stanley Weintraub.
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Abstract:

"Little seems to have changed since Victoria's day in the instant magnetism of British royalty across the Atlantic; yet for the first generations liberated by revolution, the British Isles and its sovereigns seemed as remote as the Moon. In the young nation, Americans who were little interested in the sons and daughters of their last king, George III, developed a love-hate relationship with Queen Victoria, his granddaughter, that lasted all her sixty-four years on the throne, ending only with her death in the first weeks of the 20th century"--

"Little seems to have changed since Victoria's day in the instant magnetism of British royalty across the Atlantic; yet for the first generations liberated by revolution, the British Isles and its sovereigns seemed as remote as the Moon. In the young nation, Americans who were little interested in the sons and daughters of their last king, George III, developed a love-hate relationship with Queen Victoria, his granddaughter, that lasted all her sixty-four years on the throne, ending only with her death in the first weeks of the last century. Victoria's long reign encompassed much of the time in which the young United States was growing up. The responses of Americans toward Victoria reveal not only what they thought of her (and her husband) as people and as monarchs, but reflect their own ambitions, confidence, smugness, insecurities - and sense of loss. Parting from England brought a surge of pride, but it also carried with it an unanticipated price. American encounters with Victoria as person and as symbol evoke the costs of relinquishing a history, a tradition, a ceremonial texture. A professedly egalitarian society found itself instantly without some of the familiar associations it valued, and Americans recognized the deficiency. Often, as a matter of pride, they left that realization unspoken. Victorian Yankees at Queen Victoria's Court is, then, a selective lens into nineteenth-century America -- an offbeat way to look at a people and a nation possessed with unruly energy and burgeoning into a wary greatness"--

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