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Video resources on the Constitution 2009

Autor: Anthony M KennedyStephen G BreyerSandra Day O'ConnorAntonin ScaliaJohn G RobertsTodos autores
Editorial: [Philadelphia] : Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands, ©2009.
Serie: Sunnylands seminars.
Edición/Formato:   Video DVD : Inglés (eng)Ver todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
"Disc 1. Freedom of speech: Amid the turmoil of the 1960s, students decided to wear black armbands to protest the Vietnam War, igniting a legal battle that led to a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision, Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), which defined students' right to free speech in school. This conversation focuses on free speech in light of Tinker and the Morse v. Frederick (2007)  Leer más
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Detalles

Tipo de material: Grabación de video
Tipo de documento: Material visual
Todos autores / colaboradores: Anthony M Kennedy; Stephen G Breyer; Sandra Day O'Connor; Antonin Scalia; John G Roberts; Ruth Bader Ginsburg; Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands.
Número OCLC: 432335869
Nota del idioma: Closed captioned.
Notas: Title from container.
A project of The Annenberg Foundation Trust at Sunnylands.
Reparto: Stephen G. Breyer, Sandra Day O'Connor, Anthony M. Kennedy.
Descripción: 2 videodiscs (98 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Detalles: DVD.
Contenido: Disc 1. Conversation on the Constitution with Justices Stephen G. Breyer, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Anthony M. Kennedy : freedom of speech - Conversation on the Constitution with Justices Stephen G. Breyer, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Anthony M. Kennedy : jury service - FAQs : juries. Disc 2. The Constitution project : Yick Wo and the Equal Protection clause - Constitution project : Korematsu and civil liberties.
Título de la serie: Sunnylands seminars.
Otros títulos: Constitution project documentaries
Conversations on the Constitution
FAQs: juries

Resumen:

"Disc 1. Freedom of speech: Amid the turmoil of the 1960s, students decided to wear black armbands to protest the Vietnam War, igniting a legal battle that led to a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision, Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), which defined students' right to free speech in school. This conversation focuses on free speech in light of Tinker and the Morse v. Frederick (2007) case. Jury Service: This conversation explores the history and responsibilities of juries and the role they play in the United States judicial system. Juries: In 11 short video segments, constitutional experts, lawyers and judges discuss the importance of jury service, including the history of English and American juries, types of juries, qualifications for jury service and what to expect as a juror. Disc 2. Yick Wo and the Equal Protection clause: In Yick Wo v. Hopkins (1886), the U.S. Supreme Court held that non-citizens had due process rights under the 14th Amendment. the plaintiff, an immigrant from China who had run a laundry service for 22 years, filed suit after he was denied a permit to operate his business. The Supreme Court unanimously ruled that although the laundry permit law was race-neutral, it was applied in a discriminatory fashion. Korematsu and civil liberties: After America was attacked by Japan at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 consigning 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry (two-thirds of them American citizens) to internment camps. Fred Korematsu challenged the internment all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. In Korematsu v. United States (1944), the court sided with the government. Decades later, Congress and the U.S. president formally apologized for the internment" -- Container.

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Datos enlazados


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schema:description""Disc 1. Freedom of speech: Amid the turmoil of the 1960s, students decided to wear black armbands to protest the Vietnam War, igniting a legal battle that led to a landmark U.S. Supreme Court decision, Tinker v. Des Moines Independent Community School District (1969), which defined students' right to free speech in school. This conversation focuses on free speech in light of Tinker and the Morse v. Frederick (2007) case. Jury Service: This conversation explores the history and responsibilities of juries and the role they play in the United States judicial system. Juries: In 11 short video segments, constitutional experts, lawyers and judges discuss the importance of jury service, including the history of English and American juries, types of juries, qualifications for jury service and what to expect as a juror. Disc 2. Yick Wo and the Equal Protection clause: In Yick Wo v. Hopkins (1886), the U.S. Supreme Court held that non-citizens had due process rights under the 14th Amendment. the plaintiff, an immigrant from China who had run a laundry service for 22 years, filed suit after he was denied a permit to operate his business. The Supreme Court unanimously ruled that although the laundry permit law was race-neutral, it was applied in a discriminatory fashion. Korematsu and civil liberties: After America was attacked by Japan at Pearl Harbor on December 7, 1941, President Franklin Delano Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 consigning 120,000 people of Japanese ancestry (two-thirds of them American citizens) to internment camps. Fred Korematsu challenged the internment all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court. In Korematsu v. United States (1944), the court sided with the government. Decades later, Congress and the U.S. president formally apologized for the internment" -- Container."
schema:description"Disc 1. Conversation on the Constitution with Justices Stephen G. Breyer, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Anthony M. Kennedy : freedom of speech - Conversation on the Constitution with Justices Stephen G. Breyer, Sandra Day O'Connor, and Anthony M. Kennedy : jury service - FAQs : juries. Disc 2. The Constitution project : Yick Wo and the Equal Protection clause - Constitution project : Korematsu and civil liberties."
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