skip to content
Visions of the courtly body : the patronage of George Villiers, first Duke of Buckingham, and the triumph of painting at the Stuart Court Preview this item
ClosePreview this item

Visions of the courtly body : the patronage of George Villiers, first Duke of Buckingham, and the triumph of painting at the Stuart Court

Author: Christiane Hille
Publisher: Berlin : Akademie Verlag, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"As the first comprehensive study of Buckingham's patronage of the visual arts, this book is concerned with the question of how the painted image of the courtier transferred strategies of social distinction that had originated in the masque to the language of painting. Establishing a new grammar in the competing rhetorics of bodily self-fashioning, this recast notion of portraiture contributed to an epistemological  Read more...
You are not connected to the Ringling Museum of Art Library network. Access to online content and services may require you to authenticate with your library. Florida Electronic Library Catalog
Getting this item's online copy... Getting this item's online copy...

Find a copy in the library

Getting this item's location and availability... Getting this item's location and availability...

WorldCat

Find it in libraries globally
Worldwide libraries own this item

Details

Genre/Form: Portraits
Named Person: George Villiers Buckingham, Duke of; House of Stuart
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Christiane Hille
ISBN: 9783050059082 3050059087
OCLC Number: 817948580
Notes: "This book was submitted as a PhD thesis to Humboldt-Universität Berlin in 2008." (p. IX)
Description: ix, 302 p. : ill. (some color) ; 24 cm.
Responsibility: Christiane Hille.

Abstract:

"As the first comprehensive study of Buckingham's patronage of the visual arts, this book is concerned with the question of how the painted image of the courtier transferred strategies of social distinction that had originated in the masque to the language of painting. Establishing a new grammar in the competing rhetorics of bodily self-fashioning, this recast notion of portraiture contributed to an epistemological change in perceptions of visual representation at the early modern English court, in the course of which painting advanced to the central art form in the aesthetics of kingship." (cover - p. 4)
Retrieving notes about this item Retrieving notes about this item

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.