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Visual power and fame in René d'Anjou, Geoffrey Chaucer, and the Black Prince

Author: Sunhee Kim Gertz
Publisher: New York : Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.
Series: New Middle Ages (Palgrave Macmillan (Firm))
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Reading semiotically against the backdrop of medieval mirrors of princes, Arthurian narratives, and chronicles, this study examines how René d'Anjou (1409-1480), Geoffrey Chaucer's House of Fame (ca. 1375-1380), and Edward the Black Prince (1330-1376) explore fame's visual power. While very different in approach, they all three reject the classical suggestion that fame is bestowed; challenge or nuance the  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: René, King of Naples and Jerusalem; Geoffrey Chaucer; Edward, Prince of Wales; Edward, Prince of Wales; René, King of Naples and Jerusalem
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Sunhee Kim Gertz
ISBN: 9781403970534 140397053X
OCLC Number: 226357078
Description: xx, 227 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: Introduction --
Fame and Fürstenspiegel --
Rene; d'Anjou's Negotiations with Fame: Creating for a Future Past --
Chaucer's House of Fame: The Quasi-Iconoclastic Present --
Edward the Black Prince, The Future King --
Conclusion
Series Title: New Middle Ages (Palgrave Macmillan (Firm))
Responsibility: SunHee Kim Gertz.
More information:

Abstract:

"Reading semiotically against the backdrop of medieval mirrors of princes, Arthurian narratives, and chronicles, this study examines how René d'Anjou (1409-1480), Geoffrey Chaucer's House of Fame (ca. 1375-1380), and Edward the Black Prince (1330-1376) explore fame's visual power. While very different in approach, they all three reject the classical suggestion that fame is bestowed; challenge or nuance the attraction held by the unpredictable goddess; and understand that particularly in positions of leadership, it is necessary to communicate effectively with audiences in order to secure fame. Thus, they shed light on fame's intoxicating but deceptively simple promise of elite glory"--Provided by publisher.

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Linked Data


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