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Washington's crossing

Author: David Hackett Fischer
Publisher: Oxford, England ; New York : Oxford University Press, [2004] ©2004
Series: Pivotal moments in American history.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Six months after the Declaration of Independence, the American Revolution was all but lost. A powerful British force had routed the Americans at New York, occupied three colonies, and advanced within sight of Philadelphia. Yet George Washington, and many other Americans, refused to let the Revolution die. On Christmas night, as a howling nor'easter struck the Delaware Valley, he led his men across the river and  Read more...
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Named Person: George Washington
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: David Hackett Fischer
ISBN: 0195170342 9780195170344
OCLC Number: 53075605
Awards: Pulitzer Prize, History, 2005.
Description: x, 564 pages : illustrations, maps ; 24 cm
Contents: Three armies in America:--
The rebels --
The regulars --
The Hessians --
A cataract of disaster:--
Plan of the campaign --
The fall of New York --
The retreat --
The pivot point:--
The crisis --
The occupation --
The opportunity --
The crossing:--
The river --
The march --
The surprise --
Risking it all:--
Hard choices --
Good g round --
The bridge --
The boldest stroke:--
Two councils --
The Battle at Princeton --
The aftermath.
Series Title: Pivotal moments in American history.
Responsibility: David Hackett Fischer.
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Abstract:

In a dramatic and colorful narrative of a pivotal moment in American history, we see how the campaign developed in a web of hard choices by many actors on both sides of the Delaware. 91 halftones,15  Read more...

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...a rapid-fire narrative built around an episode enshrined in American folklore, engaging thumbnail sketches of the major players, a willingness to expose conventional wisdom to the harsh light of Read more...

 
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Well-written, pro-American historical account

by vleighton (WorldCat user published 2007-01-20) Very Good Permalink
This text of this book is about the crossing of the Delaware and the two battles of Trenton and the battle of Princeton. The subtext, however, is that George Washington was an exemplar of current management fashions. His army was a Learning Organization, where the commander-in-chief listened to his subordinates...
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schema:description""Six months after the Declaration of Independence, the American Revolution was all but lost. A powerful British force had routed the Americans at New York, occupied three colonies, and advanced within sight of Philadelphia. Yet George Washington, and many other Americans, refused to let the Revolution die. On Christmas night, as a howling nor'easter struck the Delaware Valley, he led his men across the river and attacked the exhausted Hessian garrison at Trenton, killing or capturing nearly a thousand men. A second battle of Trenton followed within days. The Americans held off a counterattack by Lord Cornwallis's best troops, then were almost trapped by the British force. Under cover of night, Washington's men stole behind the enemy and struck them again, defeating a brigade at Princeton. The British were badly shaken. In twelve weeks of winter fighting, their army suffered severe damage, their hold on New Jersey was broken, and their strategy was ruined. Fischer's richly textured narrative reveals the crucial role of contingency in these events. We see how the campaign unfolded in a sequence of difficult choices by many, from generals to civilians, on both sides. While British and German forces remained rigid and hierarchical, Americans evolved an open and flexible system that was fundamental to their success. The startling success of Washington and his compatriots not only saved the faltering American Revolution, but helped to give it new meaning."--Publisher's description."@en
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