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Water : the fate of our most precious resource

Author: Marq De Villiers
Publisher: Boston, MA : Houghton Mifflin, 2001.
Edition/Format:   Book : English : 1st Mariner Books edView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Examines how water has been used to create and destroy civilizations throughout history and discusses the problems that could arise in the future if the world's water supply isn't protected.
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
De Villiers, Marq.
Water.
Boston, MA : Houghton Mifflin, 2001
(OCoLC)605186587
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Marq De Villiers
ISBN: 0618127445 9780618127443 0618030093 9780618030095
OCLC Number: 43365804
Description: xvi, 352 p. : maps ; 21 cm.
Contents: The Where, What, and How Much of the Water World --
Water in Peril --
Is the crisis looming, or has it already loomed? --
The Natural Dispensation --
Who has how much, and who's running out? --
Water in History --
Some things never change: how humans have always discovered, diverted, accumulated, regulated, hoarded, and misused water --
Remaking the Water World --
Climate, Weather, and Water --
Are we changing the first, and will changes to the other two necessarily follow? --
Unnatural Selection --
Contamination, degradation, pollution, and other human gifts to the hydrosphere --
The Aral Sea --
An object lesson in the principle of unforeseen consequences --
To Give a Dam --
Dams are clean, safe, and store water for use in bad years, so why have they suddenly become anathema? --
The Problem with Irrigation --
Irrigated lands are shrinking, and irrigation is joining dams on an ecologist's hit list. Why? --
Shrinking Aquifers --
If water mines ever run out, what then? --
The Reengineered River --
If you turn a river into a sewer, you can turn it back into a river again --
The Politics of Water --
The Middle East --
If the water burden really is a zero-sum game, how do we get past the arithmetic? --
The Tigris-Euphrates System --
Shoot an arrow of peace into the air, and get a quiverful of suspicions and paranoias in return --
The Nile --
With Egypt adding another million people every nine months, demand is already in critical conflict with supply. Another zero-sum game? --
The United States and Its Neighbors.
Responsibility: Marq De Villiers.

Abstract:

Examines how water has been used to create and destroy civilizations throughout history and discusses the problems that could arise in the future if the world's water supply isn't protected.

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