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We shall be no more : suicide and self-government in the newly United States Preview this item
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We shall be no more : suicide and self-government in the newly United States

Author: Richard Bell
Publisher: Cambridge, Mass. : Harvard University Press, 2012.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:

Though suicide is an individual act, Richard Bell reveals its broad social implications in early America. From Revolution to Reconstruction, everyone--parents, newspapermen, ministers and  Read more...

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Details

Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Richard Bell
ISBN: 9780674063723 0674063724
OCLC Number: 727047848
Description: 332 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm
Contents: Suicide and the state of the union --
The sorrows of young readers --
Saving sinking strangers --
Wounds in the belly of the state --
The threshold of heaven --
The problem of slave resistance.
Responsibility: Richard Bell.
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The conflict between individual liberty and mutual obligation was at the heart of republican society and government, and in Bell's capable hands suicide is revealed as a crucial battleground in that Read more...

 
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