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Weaving and binding : immigrant gods and female immortals in ancient Japan

Author: Michael Como
Publisher: Honolulu : University of Hawaii Press, 2010.
Edition/Format:   eBook : Document : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"Among the most exciting developments in the study of Japanese religion over the past two decades has been the discovery of tens of thousands of ritual vessels, implements, and scapegoat dolls (hitogata) from the Nara (710-784) and early Heian (794-1185) periods. Because inscriptions on many of the items are clearly derived from Chinese rites of spirit pacification, it is now evident that previous scholarship has  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Electronic books
Additional Physical Format: Print version:
Como, Michael.
Weaving and binding.
Honolulu : University of Hawaii Press, 2010
(DLC) 2009015371
(OCoLC)318716145
Material Type: Document, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File
All Authors / Contributors: Michael Como
ISBN: 9781441671141 1441671145 9780824837525 0824837525
OCLC Number: 663886536
Description: 1 online resource (xxi, 306 p.)
Contents: Immigrant gods on the road to Jindo --
Karakami and animal sacrifice --
Female rulers and female immortals --
The queen mother of the west and the ghosts of the Buddhist tradition --
Shamanesses, lavatories, and the magic of silk --
Silkworms and consorts --
Silkworm cults in the heavenly grotto : Amaterasu and the children of Ama No --
Hoakari.
Responsibility: Michael Como.

Abstract:

Argues that both the Japanese royal system and the Japanese Buddhist tradition owe much to continental rituals centered on the manipulation of yin and yang, animal sacrifice, and spirit quelling.  Read more...

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