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Weaving ourselves into the land : Charles Godfrey Leland, "Indians," and the study of Native American religions

Author: Thomas Parkhill
Publisher: Albany : State University of New York Press, ©1997.
Series: SUNY series in Native American religions.
Edition/Format:   Book : State or province government publication : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"It is now over half a millennium since the first sustained contact between the peoples of Europe and North America, yet Native Americans and especially their religious traditions still fascinate those who are not Native. In Weaving Ourselves in to the Land, Thomas Parkhill argues that this fascination draws much more on a stereotype of the "Indian" than on the lives and history of actual Native Americans. This  Read more...
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Named Person: Charles Godfrey Leland; Charles Godfrey Leland; Charles Godfrey Leland; Charles Godfrey Leland
Material Type: Government publication, State or province government publication
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas Parkhill
ISBN: 0791434532 9780791434536 0791434540 9780791434543
OCLC Number: 35360751
Description: xi, 238 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.
Contents: An introduction to the conversation: Charles G. Leland, and naming --
The story of Kluskap and Malsum --
The making of "the real gospel of manliness" --
Raw data and cooked: rendering "Indian" into Aryans --
Of conversations: Savagism, primitivism, and the use of the "Indian" stereotype --
Weaving himself into the landscape: Charles Leland's use of the "Indian" stereotype --
In the absence of the wisdom of the elders: the contemporary use of the "Indian" stereotype --
Reworking the "Indian" for place: scholars and native Americans.
Series Title: SUNY series in Native American religions.
Responsibility: Thomas C. Parkhill.

Abstract:

"It is now over half a millennium since the first sustained contact between the peoples of Europe and North America, yet Native Americans and especially their religious traditions still fascinate those who are not Native. In Weaving Ourselves in to the Land, Thomas Parkhill argues that this fascination draws much more on a stereotype of the "Indian" than on the lives and history of actual Native Americans. This stereotype, whether used approvingly or disparagingly, has informed the work of authors writing about Native American religions for audiences with both general or professional interest. The figure of Charles Godfrey Leland plays an important part in Parkhill's investigation. Leland's 1884 collection of "legends" about the Micmac, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot culture hero Kluskap becomes the touchstone for reflection on the larger study of Native American religions. The author argues that most scholars of these religions, including himself, continue to be - like Leland over a hundred years ago - bewitched by the stereotype of the "Indian.""--BOOK JACKET.

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schema:reviewBody""It is now over half a millennium since the first sustained contact between the peoples of Europe and North America, yet Native Americans and especially their religious traditions still fascinate those who are not Native. In Weaving Ourselves in to the Land, Thomas Parkhill argues that this fascination draws much more on a stereotype of the "Indian" than on the lives and history of actual Native Americans. This stereotype, whether used approvingly or disparagingly, has informed the work of authors writing about Native American religions for audiences with both general or professional interest. The figure of Charles Godfrey Leland plays an important part in Parkhill's investigation. Leland's 1884 collection of "legends" about the Micmac, Maliseet, Passamaquoddy, and Penobscot culture hero Kluskap becomes the touchstone for reflection on the larger study of Native American religions. The author argues that most scholars of these religions, including himself, continue to be - like Leland over a hundred years ago - bewitched by the stereotype of the "Indian.""--BOOK JACKET."
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