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The West and the rest : globalization and the terrorist threat

Author: Roger Scruton
Publisher: Wilmington, Del. : ISI Books, 2002.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"In The West and the Rest, Scruton argues that to comprehend Islamist terrorism, one must understand what is unique - and what is potentially dangerous - about Western institutions, ideas, and technology." "Scruton shows how the different religious and philosophical roots of Western and Islamic societies have resulted in those societies' profoundly divergent beliefs about the nature of political order. For one  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Scruton, Roger.
West and the rest.
Wilmington, Del. : ISI Books, 2002
(OCoLC)624733681
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Roger Scruton
ISBN: 1882926811 9781882926817 0826464963 9780826464965
OCLC Number: 50764160
Description: xi, 187 p. ; 20 cm.
Contents: Social contract --
Enlightenment, citizenship, and loyalty --
Holy law --
Globalization --
Conclusion.
Responsibility: Roger Scruton.

Abstract:

"In The West and the Rest, Scruton argues that to comprehend Islamist terrorism, one must understand what is unique - and what is potentially dangerous - about Western institutions, ideas, and technology." "Scruton shows how the different religious and philosophical roots of Western and Islamic societies have resulted in those societies' profoundly divergent beliefs about the nature of political order. For one thing, the idea of the social contract, crucial to the self-conception of Western nations, is entirely absent in Islamic societies. Similarly, Scruton explains why the notions of territorial jurisdiction, citizenship, and the independent legitimacy of secular authority and law are both specifically Western and fundamentally antipathetic to Islamic thought."--BOOK JACKET.

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schema:reviewBody""In The West and the Rest, Scruton argues that to comprehend Islamist terrorism, one must understand what is unique - and what is potentially dangerous - about Western institutions, ideas, and technology." "Scruton shows how the different religious and philosophical roots of Western and Islamic societies have resulted in those societies' profoundly divergent beliefs about the nature of political order. For one thing, the idea of the social contract, crucial to the self-conception of Western nations, is entirely absent in Islamic societies. Similarly, Scruton explains why the notions of territorial jurisdiction, citizenship, and the independent legitimacy of secular authority and law are both specifically Western and fundamentally antipathetic to Islamic thought."--BOOK JACKET."
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