skip to content
The western landscape in Cormac McCarthy and Wallace Stegner : myths of the frontier Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The western landscape in Cormac McCarthy and Wallace Stegner : myths of the frontier

Author: Megan Riley McGilchrist
Publisher: New York : Routledge, 2010.
Series: Routledge transnational perspectives on American literature, 12.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"The western American landscape has always had great significance in American thinking, requiring an unlikely union between frontier mythology and the reality of a fragile western environment. Additionally it has borne the burden of being a gendered space, seen by some as the traditional "virgin land" of the explorers and pioneers, subject to masculine desires, and by others as a masculine space in which the  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy online

Links to this item

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Named Person: Cormac McCarthy; Wallace Stegner; Cormac McCarthy; Wallace Earle Stegner; Cormac McCarthy; Wallace Stegner
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Megan Riley McGilchrist
ISBN: 9780415806114 0415806119
OCLC Number: 316836167
Description: x, 251 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: Changing landscape --
Myth, environment, gender --
Stegner's west --
McCarthy's western fictions --
Across a great divide.
Series Title: Routledge transnational perspectives on American literature, 12.
Responsibility: Megan Riley McGilchrist.
More information:

Abstract:

Establishes a link between the western American writers, Wallace Stegner and Cormac McCarthy. This book examines the treatment of landscape and nature in their works, suggesting that they exemplify  Read more...

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/316836167>
library:oclcnum"316836167"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/316836167>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"2010"
schema:description"Changing landscape -- Myth, environment, gender -- Stegner's west -- McCarthy's western fictions -- Across a great divide."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/793981144>
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The western landscape in Cormac McCarthy and Wallace Stegner : myths of the frontier"@en
schema:publisher
schema:reviews
rdf:typeschema:Review
schema:itemReviewed<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/316836167>
schema:reviewBody""The western American landscape has always had great significance in American thinking, requiring an unlikely union between frontier mythology and the reality of a fragile western environment. Additionally it has borne the burden of being a gendered space, seen by some as the traditional "virgin land" of the explorers and pioneers, subject to masculine desires, and by others as a masculine space in which the feminine is neither desired nor appreciated. Both Wallace Stegner and Cormac McCarthy focus on this landscape and environment; its spiritual, narrative, symbolic, imaginative, and ideological force is central to their work." "In this study, Megan McGilchrist shows how their various treatments of these issues relate to the social climates (pre- and post-Vietnam era) in which they were written, and how despite historical discontinuities, both Stegner and McCarthy reveal a similar unease about the effects of the myth of the frontier on American thought and life. The gendering of the landscape is revealed as indicative of the attempts to deny the failure of the myth, and to force the often numinous western landscape into parameters which will never contain it. Stegner's pre-Vietnam sensibility allows the natural world to emerge tentatively triumphant from the ruins of frontier mythology, whereas McCarthy's conclusions suggest a darker future for the West in particular and America in general. However, McGilchrist suggests that the conclusion of McCarthy's Border Trilogy, upon which her arguments regarding McCarthy are largely based, offers a gleam of hope in its final conclusion of acceptance of the feminine."--Jacket."
schema:url
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.