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What 'counts' in English class? : a study of classroom assessment practices among California high school teachers

Author: Keni Brayton Cox
Publisher: 1994.
Dissertation: Thesis (Ph. D.)--University of California, Riverside, 1994.
Edition/Format:   Thesis/dissertation : Document : Thesis/dissertation : Manuscript : eBook   Archival Material   Computer File : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This descriptive study was designed to profile current classroom assessment and grading practices among California high school English language arts teachers in order to build a knowledge base for assessment reform. A random sample of 79 medium to large high schools, stratified according to percent of minority student population, was identified and 1201 questionnaires were distributed resulting in responses from 467  Read more...
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Details

Genre/Form: Dissertations, Academic
Additional Physical Format: Cox, Keni Brayton.
What 'counts' in English class? : a study of classroom assessment practices among California high school teachers.
1994
(OCoLC)33320675
Material Type: Document, Thesis/dissertation, Manuscript, Internet resource
Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File, Archival Material
All Authors / Contributors: Keni Brayton Cox
OCLC Number: 741788721
Notes: Includes abstract.
Reproduction Notes: Electronic reproduction. [Ann Arbor, Mich.] : ProQuest, 2011. Mode of access: World Wide Web. Access restricted to subscribing institutions.
Description: xvii, 268 leaves ; 28 cm.
Other Titles: Study of classroom assessment practices among California high school teachers.
Responsibility: by Keni Ilo Brayton Cox.

Abstract:

This descriptive study was designed to profile current classroom assessment and grading practices among California high school English language arts teachers in order to build a knowledge base for assessment reform. A random sample of 79 medium to large high schools, stratified according to percent of minority student population, was identified and 1201 questionnaires were distributed resulting in responses from 467 teachers (39%). A follow-up survey mailed to a sample of volunteers resulted in 115 returns, an 80% response. Findings included the following: (1) Classroom assessment activities include a variety of traditional paper and pencil activities, but formal writing assignments 'count' more. (2) Less than one third of the teachers reported routine use of portfolios; (3) Most teachers reported some consideration of non-achievement related factors when assigning grades; a majority believe that grades motivate students. (4) A majority expressed support of written standards or rubrics for assessment; many fewer reported using these tools. (5) Personal factors, including philosophy, influenced respondents more than policy or high stakes tests; most teachers are satisfied with their current practice. (6) Teachers in schools with the highest percentage of minority students reported significantly less use of portfolios than teachers in schools with smaller percentages of minority students (p $<$.004), while teachers of honors and above average students reported using a greater variety of writing activities than teachers of average or below average students (p $<$.004). These findings were part of a general pattern of differences in assessment practice relative to percent of minority population and student ability level. (7) Findings suggest a possible relationship between teacher gender, college major, and professional development experience with assessment practice. Future research is recommended to explore these connections as well as the relationship between grades and motivation. The pattern of findings connecting student ability level and percent of minority student population with reduced opportunities to engage in authentic kinds of assessment has important implications for assessment reform and teacher training.

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