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When God spoke Greek : the Septuagint and the making of the Christian Bible

Author: T M Law
Publisher: Oxford ; New York : Oxford University Press, [2013]
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
How did the New Testament writers and the earliest Christians come to adopt the Jewish scriptures as their first Old Testament? And why are our modern Bibles related more to the rabbinic Hebrew Bible than to the Greek Bible of the early Church? The Septuagint, the name given to the translation of the Hebrew scriptures between the third century BC and the second century AD, played a central role in the Bible's  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: T M Law
ISBN: 9780199781713 0199781710 9780199781720 0199781729
OCLC Number: 827261033
Description: 216 pages ; 25 cm
Contents: Why this book? --
When the world became Greek --
Was there a Bible before the Bible? --
The first Bible translators --
Gog and his not-so-merry grasshoppers --
Bird droppings, stoned elephants, and exploding dragons --
E pluribus unum --
The Septuagint behind the New Testament --
The Septuagint in the New Testament --
The new Old Testament --
God's word for the church --
The man of steel and the man who worshipped the sun --
The man with the burning hand versus the man with the honeyed sword --
A postscript.
Responsibility: Timothy Michael Law.
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Abstract:

Timothy Michael Law offers the first book for non-specialists to illuminate the Septuagint and its significance for religious and world history.  Read more...

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It is a gripping tale, beautifully told, and should be of profound interest to any reader of the Jewish or Christian BibleTimothy Michael Law has written the first introduction to the LXX that can be Read more...

 
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