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When I lived in modern times

Author: Linda Grant
Publisher: New York : Dutton, ©2000.
Edition/Format:   Book : Fiction : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
An unsentimental, iconoclastic coming of age story of both a country (Israel) and a young immigrant, Grant's first novel introduces an unusually appealing heroine, narrator Evelyn Sert, and provides an unforgettable glimpse of a time and place rarely observed from an unsparing point of view. Na ve and idealistic, 20-year-old Evelyn, an incipient Zionist, leaves London for Palestine in April 1946 under false  Read more...
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Genre/Form: Historical fiction
Fiction
History
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Grant, Linda, 1951-
When I lived in modern times.
New York : Dutton, c2000
(OCoLC)606481481
Material Type: Fiction
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Linda Grant
ISBN: 0525945946 9780525945949
OCLC Number: 44683500
Notes: Originally published: London : Granta Books, 2000.
Description: 260 p. ; 23 cm.
Responsibility: Linda Grant.

Abstract:

An unsentimental, iconoclastic coming of age story of both a country (Israel) and a young immigrant, Grant's first novel introduces an unusually appealing heroine, narrator Evelyn Sert, and provides an unforgettable glimpse of a time and place rarely observed from an unsparing point of view. Na ve and idealistic, 20-year-old Evelyn, an incipient Zionist, leaves London for Palestine in April 1946 under false pretenses. Devoid of useful skills, she barely survives a stint on a kibbutz. Later, in Tel Aviv, she gets a job in a hairdressing salon, passing herself off as Priscilla Jones, the wife of a British soldier. To her neighbors she acknowledges that she's a Jew, but she's puzzled that she has more in common with the British colonials than with the motley collection of Jews from many lands and widely disparate religious, social and economic backgrounds, all of them busy reinventing themselves. After falling in love with a chameleon-like man she knows as Johnny, who impersonates a British army officer, she's not really surprised to find that he's a terrorist with the Irgun underground, working cold-bloodedly to end the British Mandate. Unwittingly, Evelyn gives Johnny information that results in violence. The quiet force of this astonishingly mature novel comes in watching Evelyn's simplistic worldview gradually give way to disillusionment as she becomes aware of the moral ambiguities and paradoxes on all sides. Readers will be struck by the timeliness of Grant's narrative, for she captures the excitement and danger of a volatile society and the desperate measures of a homeless people convinced that they must create a state. The implications of this cautionary tale keep unfolding even after the bittersweet denouement.

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