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When silk was gold : Central Asian and Chinese textiles

Author: James C Y Watt; Anne E Wardwell; Cleveland Museum of Art.; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)
Publisher: New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art in cooperation with the Cleveland Museum of Art : Distributed by H.N. Abrams, 1997.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
The material presented in this volume significantly extends what has been known to date of Asian textiles produced from the Tang (618-907) through the early Ming period (late 14th-early 15th century), and new documentation gives full recognition to the importance of luxury textiles in the history of Asian art. Costly silks and embroideries were the primary vehicle for the migration of motifs and styles from one part
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Genre/Form: Ausstellung
Exhibition catalogs
Exhibitions
Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Watt, James C. Y.
When silk was gold.
New York : Metropolitan Museum of Art in cooperation with the Cleveland Museum of Art : Distributed by H.N. Abrams, 1997
(OCoLC)646131450
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: James C Y Watt; Anne E Wardwell; Cleveland Museum of Art.; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)
ISBN: 0870998250 9780870998256 0870998277 9780870998270 0810965135 9780810965133 0300086725 9780300086720 9780300200300 0300200307
OCLC Number: 37194959
Language Note: Glossary of Chinese and Japanese Names and Terms: in Chinese with Pinyin.
Notes: Catalog accompanying an exhibition at the Cleveland Museum of Art, 10-19-97 through 1-4-98, and at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, 3-3-98 through 5-17-98.
Description: x, 238 p. : ill. (some col.) ; 31 cm.
Contents: The Silk Trade in China and Central Asia / Morris Rossabi. Map of the Tang Dynasty and the Silk Roads, ca. 750. Map of the Northern Song, the Liao, and Their Neighbors. Map of the Southern Song, the Jin, and Their Neighbors. Map of the Mongol Empire --
1. Early Exchanges: Silks from the 8th through the 11th Century --
2. Kesi: Silk Tapestry --
3. Brocades of the Jin and Mongol Periods --
4. Luxury-Silk Weaving under the Mongols --
5. Embroideries --
Glossary: Weaving Terms --
Glossary: Embroidery Stitches --
Glossary: Chinese and Japanese Names and Terms.
Responsibility: James C.Y. Watt, Anne E. Wardwell ; with an essay by Morris Rossabi.

Abstract:

The material presented in this volume significantly extends what has been known to date of Asian textiles produced from the Tang (618-907) through the early Ming period (late 14th-early 15th century), and new documentation gives full recognition to the importance of luxury textiles in the history of Asian art. Costly silks and embroideries were the primary vehicle for the migration of motifs and styles from one part of Asia to another, particularly during the Tang and Mongol (1207-1368) periods. In addition, they provide material evidence of both the cultural and religious ties that linked ethnic groups and the impetus to artistic creativity that was inspired by exposure to foreign goods.

The demise of the Silk Roads and the end of expansionist policies, together with the rapid increase in maritime trade, brought to an end the vital economic and cultural interchange that had characterized the years preceding the death of the Ming-dynasty Yongle emperor in 1424. Overland, intrepid merchants no longer transported silks throughout Eurasia and weavers no longer traveled to distant lands. But the products that survive from that wondrous time attest to a glorious era - when silk was resplendent as gold.

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