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Where did all the growth go? : external shocks, social conflict, and growth collapses

Author: Dani Rodrik; National Bureau of Economic Research.
Publisher: Cambridge, MA : National Bureau of Economic Research, ©1998.
Series: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), working paper no. 6350.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
This paper argues that domestic social conflicts are a key to understanding why growth rates lack persistence and why so many countries have experienced a growth collapse after the mid-1970s. It emphasizes conflicts interact with external shocks on the one hand, and the domestic institutions of conflict-management on the other. Econometric evidence provides support for this hypothesis. Countries that experienced the  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Rodrik, Dani.
Where did all the growth go?
Cambridge, MA : National Bureau of Economic Research, c1998
(OCoLC)647107438
Material Type: Internet resource
Document Type: Book, Internet Resource
All Authors / Contributors: Dani Rodrik; National Bureau of Economic Research.
OCLC Number: 38500668
Notes: "January 1998."
Description: 29, [21] p. : ill. ; 22 cm.
Series Title: Working paper series (National Bureau of Economic Research), working paper no. 6350.
Other Titles: External shocks, social conflict, and growth collapses
Responsibility: Dani Rodrik.

Abstract:

This paper argues that domestic social conflicts are a key to understanding why growth rates lack persistence and why so many countries have experienced a growth collapse after the mid-1970s. It emphasizes conflicts interact with external shocks on the one hand, and the domestic institutions of conflict-management on the other. Econometric evidence provides support for this hypothesis. Countries that experienced the sharpest drops in growth after 1975 were those with divided societies (as measured by indicators of inequality, ethnic fragmentation, and the like) and with weak institutions of conflict management (proxied by indicators of the quality of governmental institutions, rule of law, democratic rights, and social safety nets).

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