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White Mughals : love and betrayal in the eighteenth-century India

Autor: William Dalrymple
Editorial: New York : Viking, 2003.
Edición/Formato:   Libro : Inglés (eng) : 1st American edVer todas las ediciones y todos los formatos
Base de datos:WorldCat
Resumen:
"James Achilles Kirkpatrick was the British Resident at the court of the Nizam of Hyderabad when in 1798 he glimpsed Khair un-Nissa - "Most Excellent among Women"--The great-niece of the Nizam's prime minister and a direct descendant of the Prophet. Kirkpatrick had gone to India as an ambitious soldier in the army of the East India Company, eager to make his name in the conquest and subjection of the subcontinent.  Leer más
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Formato físico adicional: Online version:
Dalrymple, William.
White Mughals.
New York : Viking, 2003
(OCoLC)745695872
Persona designada: James Achilles Kirkpatrick; James Achilles Kirkpatrick
Tipo de material: Recurso en Internet
Tipo de documento: Libro/Texto, Recurso en Internet
Todos autores / colaboradores: William Dalrymple
ISBN: 0670031844 9780670031849
Número OCLC: 50920759
Premios: Winner of Scottish Arts Council Book of the Year Award 2003.
Shortlisted for Hessell-Tiltman Prize for History 2003.
Descripción: xlvii, 459 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm
Contenido: Map: India in 1795 xvii --
Map: Hyderabad xix --
Family Trees xx.
Responsabilidad: William Dalrymple.
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Resumen:

From the author of the Samuel Johnson prize-shortlisted 'Return of a King', the romantic and ultimately tragic tale of a passionate love affair that transcended all the cultural, religious and  Leer más

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'William Dalrymple is that rarity, a scholar of history who can really write. This is a brilliant and compulsively readable book' Salman Rushdie 'Destined to become an instant classic' Amanda Foreman Leer más

 
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Datos enlazados


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schema:reviewBody""James Achilles Kirkpatrick was the British Resident at the court of the Nizam of Hyderabad when in 1798 he glimpsed Khair un-Nissa - "Most Excellent among Women"--The great-niece of the Nizam's prime minister and a direct descendant of the Prophet. Kirkpatrick had gone to India as an ambitious soldier in the army of the East India Company, eager to make his name in the conquest and subjection of the subcontinent. Instead, he fell in love with Khair and overcame many obstacles - not the least of which was the fact that she was locked away in purdah and engaged to a local nobleman - to marry her. Eventually, while remaining Resident, Kirkpatrick converted to Islam and, according to Indian sources, even became a double agent working for the Hyderabadis against the East India Company." "It is a remarkable story, involving secret assignations, court intrigue, harem politics, religious disputes, and espionage. But such things were not unknown: From the sixteenth century, when the Inquisition banned the Portuguese in Goa from wearing the dhoti, to the eve of the Indian Mutiny, the "white Mughals" who wore local dress and adopted Indian ways were a source of difficulty and embarrassment to successive colonial administrations. William Dalrymple has unearthed such colorful figures as "Hindoo Stuart," who traveled with his own team of Brahmins to maintain his templeful of idols and who spent many years trying to persuade the memsahibs of Calcutta to adopt the sari; and Sir David Ochterlony, Kirkpatrick's counterpart in Delhi, who took all thirteen of his Indian wives out for evening promenades, each on the back of her own elephant."--Jacket."
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