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"Who set you flowin'?" : the African-American migration narrative

Author: Farah Jasmine Griffin
Publisher: New York : Oxford University Press, 1995.
Series: Race and American culture.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Twentieth-century America has witnessed the most widespread and sustained movement of African-Americans from the South to urban centers in the North. Who Set You Flowin'? looks at this migration across a wide range of genres - literary texts, correspondence, painting, photography, rap music, blues, and rhythm and blues - and identifies the Migration Narrative as a major theme in African-American cultural production.
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Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Farah Jasmine Griffin
ISBN: 0195088964 9780195088960 0195088972 9780195088977
OCLC Number: 30893210
Notes: Originally presented as the author's thesis (doctoral--Yale University).
Description: 232 p. : ill. ; 25 cm.
Contents: 1. "Boll Weevil in the Cotton/Devil in the White Man": Reasons for Leaving the South --
2. The South in the City: The Initial Confrontation with the Urban Landscape --
3. Safe Spaces and Other Places: Navigating the Urban Landscape --
4. To Where from Here? The Final Vision of the Migration Narrative --
5. New Directions for the Migration Narrative: Thoughts on Jazz.
Series Title: Race and American culture.
Responsibility: Farah Jasmine Griffin.
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Abstract:

This is a study of migration as depicted in African-American literature, letters, music and painting. Covering the period 1923-1992, the author identifies the "migration narrative" as a dominant  Read more...

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"Farah Griffin is a new kind of intellectual of the younger generation. She goes beyond the fashionable mantra of Race, Gender, and Class by concretely situating black people constructing themselves Read more...

 
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