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[Whom does the economic downturn benefit?]

Author: RTHK.
Publisher: Hong Kong : RTHK, 2008.
Series: Pulse, 2008/10/31.
Edition/Format:   DVD video : PAL color broadcast system : Local government publication : English
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
"This week Chief Executive Donald Tsang revealed his special taskforce to tackle the challenges posed by the global financial meltdown. Of course, much of the emphasis so far has been on the pain the financial crisis has caused, but there are opportunities for some. As they say: 'It 's an ill wind that blows nobody any good.' There are individuals and businesses for home certain aspects of the economic downturn do
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Details

Genre/Form: Interviews
Named Person: Lawrence Lessig
Material Type: Government publication, Local government publication, Videorecording
Document Type: Visual material
All Authors / Contributors: RTHK.
OCLC Number: 410158419
Language Note: In English with English subtitles.
Notes: Television programs (Hong Kong).
Credits: Production of Radio Television Hong Kong (RTHK).
Event notes: Originally released as a television broadcast on 31 October 2008.
Description: 1 videodisc (22 min.) : sd., col. ; 4 3/4 in.
Details: Disc format: DVD, PAL ; Region code: All.
Series Title: Pulse, 2008/10/31.
Other Titles: Interview Lawrence Lessig

Abstract:

"This week Chief Executive Donald Tsang revealed his special taskforce to tackle the challenges posed by the global financial meltdown. Of course, much of the emphasis so far has been on the pain the financial crisis has caused, but there are opportunities for some. As they say: 'It 's an ill wind that blows nobody any good.' There are individuals and businesses for home certain aspects of the economic downturn do bring windfalls, including first time home buyers, bankruptcy lawyers, and providers of discount goods."--RTHK web site.

"Lawrence Lessig is known as a proponent of reduced legal restrictions on copyright, trademarks, and radio frequency spectrum. He is also a professor of law at Stanford Law School and founder of its Center for Internet and Society, and the founder of Creative Commons. Recently he has announced he will stop focusing his attention on copyright and related matters and will work on political corruption instead. He was here over the weekend to launch Creative Commons in Hong Kong, and we went to speak to him."--RTHK web site.

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