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Why humans like to cry : tragedy, evolution, and the brain

Author: Michael R Trimble
Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, 2014. ©2012
Edition/Format:   Print book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Summary:
Humans are unique in shedding tears of sorrow. We do not just cry over our own problems: we seek out sad stories, go to film and the theatre to see Tragedies, and weep in response to music. What led humans to develop such a powerful social signal as tears, and to cultivate great forms of art which have the capacity to arouse us emotionally? Friedrich Nietzsche argued that Dionysian drives and music were essential to  Read more...
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Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Michael R Trimble
ISBN: 0198713495 9780198713494
OCLC Number: 870564068
Notes: "First edition published in 2012. First published in paperback 2014"--Title page verso.
Description: viii, 232 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm
Contents: Introduction --
Crying --
The neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of crying --
Evolution --
Tragedy and tears --
Tearful logic --
Why do we get pleasure from crying at the theatre? --
Appendices: Neuroanatomy --
Glossary of terms.
Responsibility: Michael Trimble.

Abstract:

Human beings are the only species to have evolved the trait of emotional crying. We even create music, fiction, film, and theatre - 'Tragedy' - to encourage crying. Michael Trimble looks at the  Read more...

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This is a fascinating cultural and neurological study about how humans are unique in shedding tears of sorrow, especially in the context of listening to music or attending the theatre... * Network Read more...

 
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