skip to content
The wind in the willows : a fragmented Arcadia Preview this item
ClosePreview this item
Checking...

The wind in the willows : a fragmented Arcadia

Author: Peter Hunt
Publisher: New York : Twayne Publishers ; Toronto : Maxwell Macmillan Canada ; New York : Maxwell Macmillan International, ©1994.
Series: Twayne's masterwork studies, no. 141.; Twayne's masterwork studies., Children's and young adult literature.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows (1908) is that rare book that sits on the line between children's and adult literature. Allusive and multilayered, Willows is not merely a book for two audiences, however. The reader can turn to it over and over again: as a child, as an adult, and as an informed and curious student of literature eager to examine the interactions among the book's structure, narrative, and  Read more...
Rating:

(not yet rated) 0 with reviews - Be the first.

Subjects
More like this

 

Find a copy in the library

&AllPage.SpinnerRetrieving; Finding libraries that hold this item...

Details

Genre/Form: Criticism, interpretation, etc
History
Named Person: Kenneth Grahame; Kenneth Grahame
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Peter Hunt
ISBN: 0805788166 9780805788167 0805788174 9780805788174
OCLC Number: 30319620
Description: xiv, 142 p. : port. ; 23 cm.
Contents: A reading : Main streams and backwaters : narrative and structure --
The shapes of the narrative : Shaping the book --
From the river bank to Dulce Domum --
"The world has held great heroes" --
Branching streams : other readings of the narrative --
Natural history : characters, animals, and personal symbolism : The meaning of the animals --
The famous Mr. Mole --
The gallant water rat --
The kindly badger --
The great Mr. Toad! --
Undercurrents and whirlpools : political and universal themes : "No problems" --
The threat on the horizon --
"Clean of the clash of sex" --
The river bank and the open road --
Food and kitchens --
The wind in the reeds, the eddies of style : The language of contrasts --
The language of evasion --
The language of literature --
"A book for youth" --
Approaches to teaching.
Series Title: Twayne's masterwork studies, no. 141.; Twayne's masterwork studies., Children's and young adult literature.
Responsibility: Peter Hunt.

Abstract:

Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows (1908) is that rare book that sits on the line between children's and adult literature. Allusive and multilayered, Willows is not merely a book for two audiences, however. The reader can turn to it over and over again: as a child, as an adult, and as an informed and curious student of literature eager to examine the interactions among the book's structure, narrative, and meaning. In The Wind in the Willows: A Fragmented Arcadia, author Peter Hunt examines the masterpiece from numerous angles. Placing the book within its literary and historical context, Hunt first examines the England in which Grahame lived and wrote. From liberal socialism to the burgeoning railroads to the suffragette movement, every facet of English life was changing, and so, too, was children's literature. And in this context of a swiftly changing society, as well as changing viewpoints toward literary genres, Grahame's new book was met with a flock of confused reviewers. From Hunt's brief study of the critical reception of Willows, we can see from the outset that critics were unclear for whom the book was intended. In his reading of Willows, Hunt uncovers the complexity of the work. The characters function differently from chapter to chapter; the symbolism means different things at different times, and basic structure bounces from one of closure to open-ended adult narrative. Even the anthropomorphism seems adjustable, both in its application in the story and in our interpretation of its meaning. In its most basic guise, Willows is composed of two narratives: Mole's and Toad's. And the contrast between these two stories could not be more apparent: Mole's journey is peaceful, local, and reflective, while the story of Toad is outgoing and nearly violent. Mole's introspective story is best suited for adult comprehension, while Toad's farcical tale plays well with children. Hunt is ever mindful of the enduring question: Is Willows a children's book, an adult's book - or is it possible to be both?

Reviews

User-contributed reviews
Retrieving GoodReads reviews...
Retrieving DOGObooks reviews...

Tags

Be the first.
Confirm this request

You may have already requested this item. Please select Ok if you would like to proceed with this request anyway.

Linked Data


<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/30319620>
library:oclcnum"30319620"
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
library:placeOfPublication
owl:sameAs<info:oclcnum/30319620>
rdf:typeschema:Book
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2008100442>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Children's stories, English--History and criticism."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
<http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2008100449>
rdf:typeschema:Intangible
schema:name"Children--Books and reading--Great Britain--History--20th century."@en
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:about
schema:copyrightYear"1994"
schema:creator
schema:datePublished"1994"
schema:description"Kenneth Grahame's The Wind in the Willows (1908) is that rare book that sits on the line between children's and adult literature. Allusive and multilayered, Willows is not merely a book for two audiences, however. The reader can turn to it over and over again: as a child, as an adult, and as an informed and curious student of literature eager to examine the interactions among the book's structure, narrative, and meaning. In The Wind in the Willows: A Fragmented Arcadia, author Peter Hunt examines the masterpiece from numerous angles. Placing the book within its literary and historical context, Hunt first examines the England in which Grahame lived and wrote. From liberal socialism to the burgeoning railroads to the suffragette movement, every facet of English life was changing, and so, too, was children's literature. And in this context of a swiftly changing society, as well as changing viewpoints toward literary genres, Grahame's new book was met with a flock of confused reviewers. From Hunt's brief study of the critical reception of Willows, we can see from the outset that critics were unclear for whom the book was intended. In his reading of Willows, Hunt uncovers the complexity of the work. The characters function differently from chapter to chapter; the symbolism means different things at different times, and basic structure bounces from one of closure to open-ended adult narrative. Even the anthropomorphism seems adjustable, both in its application in the story and in our interpretation of its meaning. In its most basic guise, Willows is composed of two narratives: Mole's and Toad's. And the contrast between these two stories could not be more apparent: Mole's journey is peaceful, local, and reflective, while the story of Toad is outgoing and nearly violent. Mole's introspective story is best suited for adult comprehension, while Toad's farcical tale plays well with children. Hunt is ever mindful of the enduring question: Is Willows a children's book, an adult's book - or is it possible to be both?"@en
schema:description"A reading : Main streams and backwaters : narrative and structure -- The shapes of the narrative : Shaping the book -- From the river bank to Dulce Domum -- "The world has held great heroes" -- Branching streams : other readings of the narrative -- Natural history : characters, animals, and personal symbolism : The meaning of the animals -- The famous Mr. Mole -- The gallant water rat -- The kindly badger -- The great Mr. Toad! -- Undercurrents and whirlpools : political and universal themes : "No problems" -- The threat on the horizon -- "Clean of the clash of sex" -- The river bank and the open road -- Food and kitchens -- The wind in the reeds, the eddies of style : The language of contrasts -- The language of evasion -- The language of literature -- "A book for youth" -- Approaches to teaching."@en
schema:exampleOfWork<http://worldcat.org/entity/work/id/1215442324>
schema:genre"History."@en
schema:genre"Criticism, interpretation, etc."@en
schema:genre"History"@en
schema:inLanguage"en"
schema:name"The wind in the willows : a fragmented Arcadia"@en
schema:numberOfPages"142"
schema:publisher
schema:publisher
schema:publisher
schema:url
schema:workExample
schema:workExample

Content-negotiable representations

Close Window

Please sign in to WorldCat 

Don't have an account? You can easily create a free account.