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Wit and mirth: or, Pills to purge melancholy

Author: Thomas D'Urfey; Henry Playford
Publisher: New York : Folklore Library Publishers, 1959.
Edition/Format:   Musical score : EnglishView all editions and formats
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Wit and mirth.
New York, Folklore Library Publishers, 1959
(OCoLC)649009352
Document Type: Musical Score
Music Type: Songs; Ballads
All Authors / Contributors: Thomas D'Urfey; Henry Playford
OCLC Number: 1192676
Notes: Collection of songs and ballads; the first two volumes. contain songs by the editor, the remaining volumes. are by various composers; unaccompanied melodies.
Running title, v. 1, 3-5: Songs compleat, pleasant, and divertive; v. 2 and 6: Pills to purge melancholy.
"Edited originally (1698-1706) by Henry Playford, and in a final six volume edition (1719-1720) by Thomas D'Urfey"--Page i.
"This edition is a facsimile reproduction of the 1876 reprint of the original edition of 1719-1720."
Description: 6 volumes in 3. : portrait ; 21 cm
Contents: v. 3. Awake my lute, arise my string ; Adzooks ches went the other day ; As I walk'd forth one summer's day ; A beggar got a beadle ; All you that lov'd our queen alive ; As I sat at my spinning-wheel ; A beggar, a beggar, a beggar I'll be ; As sad Amyntor in a meadow lay ; As I walk'd in the woods one ev'ning ; Adieu to the pleasures and follies ; A pox of the fooling and plotting ; A curse on all cares ; A pox of dull mortals of the grave ; As May in all her youthful dress ; A gentle breeze from the Lavinian sea ; A soldier and a sailor, a tinker ; Ah Jenny gin your eyes do kill ; At London che've bin ; All hands up aloft ; As I went o'er yon misty moor --
Beneath a mirtle shade. Believe me Jenny, for I tell ; Bonny lad, prithee lay thy pipe down ; Bonny lads and damsels ; Bonny lass gin thou wert mine ; Come buy my new ballad ; Come listen a while tho' the weather ; Chloris now thou art fled away ; Calm was the ev'ning, and clear ; Come sweet lass, this bonny weather ; Come if you dare, our trumpets sound ; Damon why will you die for love ; From France, from Spain, from Rome ; Forth from the dark and dismal cell ; Four and twenty fidlers all in a row ; From twelve years old, I oft have ; Frier Bacon walks again ; Fairest work of happy nature ; Fairest Jenny! thou mun love me --
Great Alexander's horse. He that a tinker, a tinker would be ; Ho boy, hey boy, come, come ; He that intends to take a wife ; How happy's the mortal, that lives ; He that is a cleer cavalier will not ; Have you e'er seen the morning sun ; How unhappy a lover am I ; Hail to the myrtle shade ; He that is resolv'd to wed ; How lovely's a woman before ; How long must woman wish in vain ; Here's a health to jolly Bacchus ; Her eyes are like the morning bright ; How blest are shepherds, how happy ; If I live to grow old, for I find ; If I live to be old, which I never ; I love a lass but cannot show it ; I am a lusty lively lad ; In the merry month of May ; I had a Chloris my delight ; If musick be the food of love ; I went to the alehouse as an honest ; In faith 'tis true, I am in love ; I'll tell you a story if it be true ; I tell thee Dick where I have been ; I'll sing you a sonnet that ne'er was ; In a humour I was late ; I saw the lass whom dear I lov'd ; I often for my Jenny strove ; Jockey was as brisk and blith a lad ; If love's a sweet passion, why --
Let wine turn a spark and ale. Lay that sullen garland by thee ; Leave off fond hermite, leave thy vow ; Like a ring without a finger ; Lament, lament you scholars all ; Love thee! good sooth, not I ; Let us drink and be merry ; Let's love, and let's laugh ; Let the daring advent'rers be toss'd ; Let's consecrate a mighty bowl ; My masters and friends ; Methinks the poor town has been ; My life and my death, are both ; Man (Man, man) is for the woman ; Now that love's holiday is come ; Now listen a while, and I ; Now God above that made all things ; Old stories tell how Hercules ; Of all the trades that ever I see ; Of all the recreations ; O the time that is past ; Oh Mother, Roger with his kisses ; Oh fie! what mean I foolish maid ; Ods hartly wounds, Ize not to plowing ; O raree show, o brave show --
Phillis at first seem'd much afraid. Poor Caelia once was very fair ; Pastora's beauties when unblown ; Pretty Armida will be kind ; Quoth John to Joan, wilt thou ; Ranging the plain one summers ; Since love hath in thine ; Since roving of late ; Some men they do delight in hounds ; Sabina in the dead of night ; Sawney is a bonny, bonny lad ; Since there's so small difference ; Sir Eglamore, that valiant knight ; Sing, sing, whilst we trip it --
There's many clinching verse is made ; The sleeping Thames one morn ; The four and twentieth day of May ; Tom and Will were shepherds swains ; Tho' Sylvia's eyes a flame could raise ; Thus all our lives long we're frolick ; Take not a woman's anger ill ; The bonny grey ey'd morn began ; The sun was just setting, the reaping ; Tho' jockey su'd me long, he met ; Tell me Jenny, tell my roundly ; The bright Laurinda, whose hard fate ; There was a jovial beggar ; Tell me no more, no more, I am deceiv'd ; The beauteous nymph look from above ; There was a bonny blade ; Tobacco is but an Indian weed ; The danger is over, the battle ; To kiss, to kiss is pretty, 'tis pretty --
Undone! undone! the lawyers are. Virgins, if e'er at length it prove ; When my hairs they grow hoary ; Will you give me leave ; Why should we boast of Arthur ; Where ever I am, or whatever I do ; Weep all ye nymphs, your floods unbind ; Why is your faithful slave disdain'd ; When money has done whate'er it can ; Why does Willy shun his dear ; With an old song, made by an old ; Wully and Georgy now beath are gean ; What ungrateful devil moves you ; Ye happy swains, whose nymphs ; Yonder comes a courteous knight ; You talk of New England ; You understand no tender vows ; Your gamester, provok'd by his loss ; Young I am and unskill'd ; You mad caps of England who merry ; You lasses and lads take leave ; You ladies who are young and gay --
v. 4. A palphry proud, prick'd up. A maiden of late, whose name ; Arise, arise, my juggy, my puggy ; A doctor without any stomach ; A pox upon this cursed life ; A restless lover I espy'd ; A shepherd set him under a thorn ; All in a misty morning ; A late expedition to Oxford ; As I came from Tottingham ; A lusty young smith at his vice ; All hail to the days that merit ; Ah cruel bloody fate, what can'st ; As fair Olinda sitting was ; All my past life is mine no more ; Ah! Chloris awake ; Alass! my poor tender heart ; Blith jockey young and gay ; Bless mortals, bless the clearing --
Come listen, good people, the whilst. Come my hearts of gold ; Cook Lorrel would needs have ; Courtiers, courtiers, think it no harm ; Could man his wish obtain ; Caelia, that I once was blest ; Come all the youths whose hearts ; Come fair one be kind ; Did you not hear ; Dermot lov'd Shela well ; Dolly, come be brisk and jolly ; Early in the dawning ; Farewel three kings, where I ; Fly merry news among the crews ; Farweel bonny Wully Craig ; Farewel the darling shades I love ; For Iris I sigh and hourly die ; Fancelia's heart is still the same ; Fly from Olinda young and fair ; Foolish swain thy sighs forbear --
Good people all, I pray give ear. God prosper long our noble king ; Go tell Amyntor gentle swain ; Happy the time when free ; Happy is the country life ; Here's a health to those men ; If any one long for a musical song ; I am a lover, and 'tis true ; I have been east, and I have ; I find I am a cuckold, I care ; If every woman was serv'd in ; I prithee sweet-heart grant me ; In summer time when flowers ; It is my delight both night and ; In fifty-five, may I never thrive ; If't please you for to hear ; In our country, and in your country ; Instead of our buildings and castles ; I'll sing you a song ; I a tender young maid have been ; In the world can ever a trade ; In the gardiners paradise sweetly ; In the shade upon the grass ; In courts, ambition kills the great ; In Paul's church-yard in London ; I never saw a face till now ; In vain she frowns, in vain ; In the long vocation ; Jenny long resisted Wully's fierce desire ; Joan to the May-pole away let's run ; Jockey late with jenny walking ; Jogging on from yonder green --
Kate, the loveliest thing. Katy's a beauty surpassing ; Lady, sweet now do not frown ; Ladys, why doth love torment you ; Listen lordlings to my story ; Long have i grieved for to see ; Let monarchs fight for pow'r ; Let the soldiers rejoyce ; Lovely Laurinda! blame not me ; Let Totnam Court and Islington ; My masters and friends, and good [2] ; My pretty maid, fain would I have known ; My mistress is a hive of bees ; My mother she will not endure ; My mind to me a kingdom is ; Maids are grown so coy of late ; My lord's son must not be forgot ; Now listen again to those things ; Now gentlemen sit ye all merry ; Not long ago as all alone I lay ; Now all my friends are laid in ; Now fie upon a jealous brain ;Nothing than Chloe e'er I knew ; Now every place fresh pleasure yields --
Oh London is a fine town. Oh the miller, the dusty ; Oh, oh lead me, lead me to some ; O love is longer than the way ; One evening a little before it was dark ; On Enfield Common, I met a woman ; One Sunday after mass, Dormet ; Oh! happy, happy groves ; On Brandon Heath, in sight of ; Prey lend me your ear if you've ; Pan leave piping, the gods have ; Prithee friend leave off thy thinking ; Pillycock came to my lady's toe ; Poor Cleonice thy garlands tear ; Some Christian people all give ear ; Since pop'ry of late is so much ; Some years of late, in eighty eight ; Shall I wasting in despair ; Some wives are good, and some ; Still I'm wishing, still desiring ; Smiling Phillis has an air ; Spare might love, oh spare --
Tho' it may seem rude. There was an old woman ; To hunt the fox is an old sport ; There was a maid the other day ; Tho' bootless I must needs complain ; They say the world is full of pelf ; There was a lady in the north ; There was a lass in Cumberland ; The wit hath long beholding been ; The beard thick or thin ; This is a structure fair ; There were too bumpkins lov'd ; To charming Caelia's arms I flew ; There was a man, a shentleman ; To find my Tom of Bedlam ; The devil he was so weather beat ; The weather's too bleak now ; These London wenches are so stout ; There lately was a maiden fair ; There is one black and sullen ; Three merry lads met at the Rose ; The fire of love in youthful blood ; Tho' the pride of my passion fair ; Thursday in the morn ; The mighty state of cuckoldom ; Take not the first refusal ill --
Upon a time I chanced to walk. Under this stone lies one ; Upon the wings of love ; When rich men die, whose purses ; Will you please to give ear a while ; When Ize came first to London Town ; What tho' I am a country lass ; Was ever a man so vext with ; What creature's that with his ; While the citizens prate ; Women are wanton, yet cunningly ; What if Betty grows old ; What's a cuckold, learn of me ; When Sawney first did wooe me ; What need we take care for ; Well I'll say that for Sir William ; What shall I do to shew how ; Why does the morn in blushes rise ; When Aurelia first I courted ; Whilst Europe is alarmed with ; When Troy Town for ten years wars ; Why should we boast of Lais ; When Cupid from his mother fled ; When I see my Strephon languish ; You courtiers scorn we country ; You maidens and wives ; Young Phaon strove the bliss to taste --
v. 5. All Christians and lay-elders too. As I went by an hospital ; A shepherd kept sheep on a ; As I was walking under a grove ; A councel grave our king did hold ; A heroe of no small renown ; As the fryer he went along ; A bonny lad came to the court ; A pox on those fools, who exclaim ; Amongst the pure ones all ; As Oyster Nan stood by her tub ; Ah! Caelia how can you be ; Are you grown so melancholy ; As Collin went from his sheep ; A wife I do hate ; A thousand several ways I try'd ; A Whig that's full ; As Cupid roguishly one day ; A young man sick and like to die ; At noon in a sultry summer's day ; Ah! how lovely sweet and dear ; Advance, advance, advance gay ; Ah! foolish lass, what mun I do --
Bold impudent Fuller invented. By moon-light on the green ; Bonny Peggy Ramsey that any ; By shady woods and purling ; Belinda! why do you distrust ; Born to surprize the world ; Bring out your coney-skins ; Bonny Scottish lads that keens ; Come bring us wine in plenty ; Come pretty birds present your ; Come fill up the bowl ; Cease lovely Strephon, cease to ; Cease whining Damon to complain ; Caelia my heart has often rang'd ; Corinna, if my fate's to love you ; Caelia's charms are past expressing ; Come beaus, virtuosos, rich heirs ; Cease, cease of Cupid to complain ; Come, come ye nymphs ; Chloe blushed, and frown'd and swore ; Caelia hence with affectation --
Did you not hear of a gallant. Divine Astrea hither flew ; Draw Cupid draw, and make ; Damon if you will believe me ; Drunk I was last night ; Delia tir'd Strephon with her ; Fair Caelia too fondly contemns ; Fly Damon fly, 'tis death to stay ; Fear not mortal, none shall harm ; Farewel ungrateful traytor ; Gilderoy was a bonny boy ; Good neighbor why do you ; How now Sister Betteris, why look ; Heaven first created woman to ; Hears not my Phillis how ; How happy's the mortal whose ; He himself courts his own ruin ; How happy and free is the ; How charming Phillis is ; Hither turn thee, hither turn thee ; Here lies William de Valence ; Ho my dear joy, now what dost ; Here's a health to the tackers ; Here are people and sports ; Hark! now the drums beat up again ; How often have I curs'd that sable deceit --
I am a young lass of Lynn. I am a jovial cobler bold ; It was a rich merchant man ; If sorrow the tyrant invade ; In the pleasant month of May ; It was a happy golden day ; I prithee send me back my heart ; In Chloris all soft charms agree ; I lik'd, but never lov'd before ; Iris beware when Strephon pursues ; I am one in whom nature has ; In vain, in vain, the God I ask ; In the devil's country there ; In elder time, there was of yore ; Ianthia the lovely, the joy ; I met with the devil ; Jilting is in such a fashion ; Jockey loves his Moggy dearly ; Jockey met with Jenny fair --
Let the females attend. Let's be jolly, fill our glasses ; Let's sing of stage-coaches ; Last Christmas 'twas my chance ; Lately as thorough the fair ; Let soldiers fight for pay and praise ; Long had Damon been admir'd ; Laurinda, who did love disdain ; Let ambition fire thy mind ; Long was the day e'er Alexis ; Let's be merry, blith and jolly ; My friend, if you would understand ; Marriage it seems is for better ; No more let Damon's eyes pursue ; Nay pish, nay pish, nay pish sir ; No, no every morning my ; Now my freedom's regain'd ; No, Phillis, tho' you've all the charms ; Now to you te dry wooers --
Once more to these arms my. One night in my ramble I ; Oh! let no eyes be dry ; Old Lewis le Grand, he raves like ; Of old soldiers, the song you ; Of late in the park a fair fancy ; Oh! how you protest and solemnly ; Philander and Sylvia, a gentle ; Poor Jenny and I we toiled ; Pretty Floramel, no tongue can ; Plague us not with idle stories ; Poor Mountfort is gone ; Pretty parrot say, when I was ; State and ambition, all joy to ; Stay, stay, shut the gates ; Slaves to London I'll deceive you ; Stay, ah stay, ah turn, ah whither ; See how fair and fine she lies ; Since Caelia only has the art ; Some brag of their Chloris ; See, sirs, see here! a doctor rare ; Swain thy hopeless passion smother --
There was an old woman liv'd. The suburbs is a fine place ; There can be no glad man ; Then Jockey wou'd a wooing away ; There was a lass of Islington ; There was a lord of worthy fame ; There was a jovial tinker ; There is a fine doctor now come ; There was a knight and he ; Think wretched mortal, think ; To the wars I must alass ; Though the pride of my passion fair ; Tell me ye Sicilian swains ; To the grove, gentle love ; Tell me no more of flames ; Tho' fortune and love may be ; That little patch upon your face ; Tho' over all mankind ; There lives an ale-draper near ; The caffalier was gone ; The devil he pull'd off his jacket ; The jolly, jolly breeze ; The jolly, jolly bowl --
Upon a holiday, when nymphs. Where gott'st thou the haver-mill ; When first Mardyke was made ; When maids live to thirty, yet never ; What life can compare ; With my strings of small wire ; When that young Damon bless'd ; Would you be a man in fashion ; When first I fair Celinda knew ; When busy fame o'er all ; Why am I the only creature ; Where would coy Amyntas run ; When gay Philander left the plain ; Wealth breeds care, love, hope ; When first Amyntas charmed ; Why so pale and wan fond lover ; When I languish'd and wish'd ; when first I saw her charming face ; While the love is thinking ; When Jemmy first began to love ; You master colours pray ; Ye brave boys and tars ; Young Coridon and Phillis ; Your hay it is mow'd ; You happy youths, whose hearts ; Young ladies that live ; You I love by all that's true ; You've been with dull prologues --
v. 6. As Amoret and Thyrsis lay. As unconcern'd and free as air ; As I am a sailor ; And now, now the duke's march ; Aurelia now one moment lost ; After the pangs of fierce desire ; A pox on the fool ; A young man lately in our town ; All joy to mortals ; A pox on the times ; A pox on such fools ; As Cupid many ages past ; All Christians that have ears to hear ; As at noon Dulcina rested ; A dean and prebendary ; A world that's full of fools and mad-men ; Astutus constabularius ; Amor est pegma ; Abroad as I was walking ; A pedlar proud as I heard tell ; A young man and a maid ; All own the young Sylvia is ; A swain in despair ; As I came down the hey land town ; A jolly young grocer of London Town ; As it befel upon one time ; A taylor good Lord, in the time of vacation ; A comely dame of Islington ; Ah! how happy's he ; A little love may prove a pleasure ; At the change as I was walking ; All you that must take a leap in the dark ; Alphonzo, if you Sir ; A worthy London prentice ; At the break of morning light --
Belinda's pretty, pretty pleasing form. Blush not redder than the morning ; Banish my Lydia these ; Beauty, like kingdoms not for one ; Beneath a cool shade Amaryllis ; Boasting fops who court the fair ; Come here's a good health ; Cupid make your virgins tender ; Corinna I excuse thy face ; Chloe found love for his Psyche ; Coy Belinda may discover ; Corinna 'tis you that I love ; Come buy my greens and flowers ; Caelia's bright beauty all others transcend ; Come from the temple, away to the bed ; Come all that are dispos'd ; Chloris, can you ; Caelia be not too complying ; Clasp'd in my dear Melinda's arms ; Come Caelia come, let's sit ; Ere Phillis with her looks did kill --
Fly, fly ye lazy hours. Fye Amaryllis, cease to grieve ; Fairest isle, all isles excelling ; Fye Jockey, never prattle ; Forgive me Chloe if I dare ; Fortune is blind and beauty unkind ; From Father Hopkins ; Fickle bliss, fantastick treasure ; Fill the glass fill, fill ; Farewel my useless scrip ; Fates I defie, I defie your advances ; Farewel Chloe, o farewel ; God prosper long our gracious queen ; Go, go, go, go falsest of thy sex ; Good morrow Gossip Joan ; How long, how long shall I pine ; Hang this whining way of wooing ; Here's the summer sprightly, gay ; How happy's the husband ; Having spent all my coin ; How happy, how happy is she ; Hang the presbyters Gill ; Honest shepherd, since ; How happy's that husband who after ; How is the world transform'd ; Hub ub, ub, boo ; Had I but love ; How happy we are ; Hear Chloe hear ; How happy's he who weds a wife ; How charming Phillis is, how fair --
If I hear Orinda swear. Just coming from sea ; If ever you mean to be kind ; I know her false ; I am come to lock all fast ; In vain Clemene you bestow ; If wine be a cordial ; I fain wou'd find a passing ; If I should go seek ; I seek no more to shady coverts ; I try'd in parks and plays ; In a flowry myrtle grove ; I am a jolly toper ; I'll tell you all, both great ; I am a cunning constable ; I courted and writ ; I'll tell thee Dick where I have ; I am a poor shepherd undone ; I love to madness, rave t' enjoy ; I'll press, I'll bless thee charming ; I'm vext to think that Damon ; I have a tenement to let --
Ken you, who comes here. Let not love, let not love on me ; Liberia's all my thought ; Let Mary live long ; Lerinda complaineth that ; Lay by your pleading ; Love's pow'r in my heart ; Let's wet the whistle ; Let's sing as one may say ; Lucinda has the de'el and all ; Love is a bauble ; Lais when you ; Lorenzo you amuse the town ; Love's passion never knew ; Let those youths who freedom ; Lavia would, but dare not venture ; Love, the sweets of love ; Marlborough's a brave commander ; My dear Corinna give me leave ; May her blest example chace ; My dear and only love ; My nose is the largest of all ; My nose is the flattest of all ; Mortals learn your lives ; Mirtillo, whilst you patch ; My friend thy beauty ; Must love, that tyrant ; My Theodora can those eyes --
Now dry up thy tears. No, no, poor suffering heart ; New pyramid's raise ; Never sigh but think of kissing ; Now, now, the queen's health ; Noble King Lud ; Now I'm resolv'd to love no more ; Not your eyes Melania move me ; Now, now the night's come ; Now Jockey and Moggy are ready ; Oh! my panting heart ; Over the mountains ; Oh how happy's he, who from ; Oh! the mighty pow'r of love ; Oh the charming month of May ; Oh Roger I've been to see Eugene ; Of all the handsome ladies ; Phillis lay aside your thinking ; Pish fye, you're rude Sir ; Phillis, I can ne'er forgive it ; Poor Sawney had marry'd a wife ; Room for gentlemen ; Retire old miser ; Richest gift of lavish nature --
She met with a country-man. Stand clear, my masters ; Sometimes I am a tapster new ; When apparell'd neat and fine ; Say cruel Amoret, how long ; Such command o'er my fate ; Sit you merry gallants ; Since Phillis swears inconstancy ; Some in the town go betimes ; Suppose a man does all he can ; Sors sine visu ; See bleeding at your feet ; Since Tom's in the chair, and every one here ; Such a happy, happy life ; To meet her Mars the queen of love ; Thus Damon knock'd at Caelia's door ; The world is a bubble ; Through the cold shady woods ; The Gordian knot ; There dwelt a widow in this town ; There was an old man ; There is a thing which in the light ; There's not a swain ; Tormenting beauty leave my breast ; Tell me why so long ; 'Tis a foolish mistake ; Tell me, tell me, charming ; Tho' thou'rt ugly and old ; Tho' you make no return ; The king is gone to Oxon Town ; Tho' I love and she knows it ; There was three travellers ; Troy had a breed of brave ; There's none so pretty ; The ordinance a-board ; That scornful Sylvia's chains ; Tom Tinker's my true love ; To you fair ladies now at land ; Then come kind Damon come ; The night is come that will ; There's a new set of rakes ; Tho' begging is an honest trade ; The rosey morn lukes blith and gay ; The restauration now's the word --
Underneath the castle wall. Unguarded lies the wishing maid ; Vobis magnis parvis dicam ; Whilst Phillis is drinking ; War, war and battle now no more ; What shall I do, I am undone ; When wit and beauty ; When Sylvia was kind ; What, love a crime ; When I have often heard young maids ; What state of life can be ; When Jockey first I saw ; When Dido was a Carthage queen ; We merry wives of Windsor ; Wo'as, me poor lass ; When on her eyes ; With sighing and wishing ; What sayest thou ; What shall I do, I've lost my heart ; When I was in the low country ; Walk up to virtue strait ; When first I lay'd siege to my Chloris ; Why alas do you now leave me ; When beauty such as yours ; When crafty fowlers would ; Who can Dorinda's beauty view ; When embracing my friends ; Why will Clemene when I gaze ; Ye commons and peers ; You guess by my wither'd face ; You friends to reformation ; Young Strephon and Phillis ; Young Strephon he has woo'd ; You ladies draw near ; You tell me Dick you've lately ; Your melancholy's all a folly ; Z--ds madam return me my heart.
Other Titles: Pills to purge melancholy
Songs compleat, pleasant, and divertive
Responsibility: edited by Thomas D'Urfey ; with an introduction by Cyrus L. Day.

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<http://www.worldcat.org/oclc/1192676> # Wit and mirth: or, Pills to purge melancholy
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   library:oclcnum "1192676" ;
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   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1219920> ; # England.
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   schema:about <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2010114153> ; # Songs, English--England
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/1126319> ; # Songs, English
   schema:about <http://id.loc.gov/authorities/subjects/sh2007101784> ; # Ballads, English--England
   schema:about <http://id.worldcat.org/fast/825896> ; # Ballads, English
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   schema:alternateName "Songs compleat, pleasant, and divertive" ;
   schema:alternateName "Pills to purge melancholy" ;
   schema:datePublished "1959" ;
   schema:description "Katy's a beauty surpassing ; Lady, sweet now do not frown ; Ladys, why doth love torment you ; Listen lordlings to my story ; Long have i grieved for to see ; Let monarchs fight for pow'r ; Let the soldiers rejoyce ; Lovely Laurinda! blame not me ; Let Totnam Court and Islington ; My masters and friends, and good [2] ; My pretty maid, fain would I have known ; My mistress is a hive of bees ; My mother she will not endure ; My mind to me a kingdom is ; Maids are grown so coy of late ; My lord's son must not be forgot ; Now listen again to those things ; Now gentlemen sit ye all merry ; Not long ago as all alone I lay ; Now all my friends are laid in ; Now fie upon a jealous brain ;Nothing than Chloe e'er I knew ; Now every place fresh pleasure yields -- Oh London is a fine town."@en ;
   schema:description "Unguarded lies the wishing maid ; Vobis magnis parvis dicam ; Whilst Phillis is drinking ; War, war and battle now no more ; What shall I do, I am undone ; When wit and beauty ; When Sylvia was kind ; What, love a crime ; When I have often heard young maids ; What state of life can be ; When Jockey first I saw ; When Dido was a Carthage queen ; We merry wives of Windsor ; Wo'as, me poor lass ; When on her eyes ; With sighing and wishing ; What sayest thou ; What shall I do, I've lost my heart ; When I was in the low country ; Walk up to virtue strait ; When first I lay'd siege to my Chloris ; Why alas do you now leave me ; When beauty such as yours ; When crafty fowlers would ; Who can Dorinda's beauty view ; When embracing my friends ; Why will Clemene when I gaze ; Ye commons and peers ; You guess by my wither'd face ; You friends to reformation ; Young Strephon and Phillis ; Young Strephon he has woo'd ; You ladies draw near ; You tell me Dick you've lately ; Your melancholy's all a folly ; Z--ds madam return me my heart."@en ;
   schema:description "The suburbs is a fine place ; There can be no glad man ; Then Jockey wou'd a wooing away ; There was a lass of Islington ; There was a lord of worthy fame ; There was a jovial tinker ; There is a fine doctor now come ; There was a knight and he ; Think wretched mortal, think ; To the wars I must alass ; Though the pride of my passion fair ; Tell me ye Sicilian swains ; To the grove, gentle love ; Tell me no more of flames ; Tho' fortune and love may be ; That little patch upon your face ; Tho' over all mankind ; There lives an ale-draper near ; The caffalier was gone ; The devil he pull'd off his jacket ; The jolly, jolly breeze ; The jolly, jolly bowl -- Upon a holiday, when nymphs."@en ;
   schema:description "Come my hearts of gold ; Cook Lorrel would needs have ; Courtiers, courtiers, think it no harm ; Could man his wish obtain ; Caelia, that I once was blest ; Come all the youths whose hearts ; Come fair one be kind ; Did you not hear ; Dermot lov'd Shela well ; Dolly, come be brisk and jolly ; Early in the dawning ; Farewel three kings, where I ; Fly merry news among the crews ; Farweel bonny Wully Craig ; Farewel the darling shades I love ; For Iris I sigh and hourly die ; Fancelia's heart is still the same ; Fly from Olinda young and fair ; Foolish swain thy sighs forbear -- Good people all, I pray give ear."@en ;
   schema:description "Where gott'st thou the haver-mill ; When first Mardyke was made ; When maids live to thirty, yet never ; What life can compare ; With my strings of small wire ; When that young Damon bless'd ; Would you be a man in fashion ; When first I fair Celinda knew ; When busy fame o'er all ; Why am I the only creature ; Where would coy Amyntas run ; When gay Philander left the plain ; Wealth breeds care, love, hope ; When first Amyntas charmed ; Why so pale and wan fond lover ; When I languish'd and wish'd ; when first I saw her charming face ; While the love is thinking ; When Jemmy first began to love ; You master colours pray ; Ye brave boys and tars ; Young Coridon and Phillis ; Your hay it is mow'd ; You happy youths, whose hearts ; Young ladies that live ; You I love by all that's true ; You've been with dull prologues -- v. 6. As Amoret and Thyrsis lay."@en ;
   schema:description "He that a tinker, a tinker would be ; Ho boy, hey boy, come, come ; He that intends to take a wife ; How happy's the mortal, that lives ; He that is a cleer cavalier will not ; Have you e'er seen the morning sun ; How unhappy a lover am I ; Hail to the myrtle shade ; He that is resolv'd to wed ; How lovely's a woman before ; How long must woman wish in vain ; Here's a health to jolly Bacchus ; Her eyes are like the morning bright ; How blest are shepherds, how happy ; If I live to grow old, for I find ; If I live to be old, which I never ; I love a lass but cannot show it ; I am a lusty lively lad ; In the merry month of May ; I had a Chloris my delight ; If musick be the food of love ; I went to the alehouse as an honest ; In faith 'tis true, I am in love ; I'll tell you a story if it be true ; I tell thee Dick where I have been ; I'll sing you a sonnet that ne'er was ; In a humour I was late ; I saw the lass whom dear I lov'd ; I often for my Jenny strove ; Jockey was as brisk and blith a lad ; If love's a sweet passion, why -- Let wine turn a spark and ale."@en ;
   schema:description "A maiden of late, whose name ; Arise, arise, my juggy, my puggy ; A doctor without any stomach ; A pox upon this cursed life ; A restless lover I espy'd ; A shepherd set him under a thorn ; All in a misty morning ; A late expedition to Oxford ; As I came from Tottingham ; A lusty young smith at his vice ; All hail to the days that merit ; Ah cruel bloody fate, what can'st ; As fair Olinda sitting was ; All my past life is mine no more ; Ah! Chloris awake ; Alass! my poor tender heart ; Blith jockey young and gay ; Bless mortals, bless the clearing -- Come listen, good people, the whilst."@en ;
   schema:description "Virgins, if e'er at length it prove ; When my hairs they grow hoary ; Will you give me leave ; Why should we boast of Arthur ; Where ever I am, or whatever I do ; Weep all ye nymphs, your floods unbind ; Why is your faithful slave disdain'd ; When money has done whate'er it can ; Why does Willy shun his dear ; With an old song, made by an old ; Wully and Georgy now beath are gean ; What ungrateful devil moves you ; Ye happy swains, whose nymphs ; Yonder comes a courteous knight ; You talk of New England ; You understand no tender vows ; Your gamester, provok'd by his loss ; Young I am and unskill'd ; You mad caps of England who merry ; You lasses and lads take leave ; You ladies who are young and gay -- v. 4. A palphry proud, prick'd up."@en ;
   schema:description "v. 3. Awake my lute, arise my string ; Adzooks ches went the other day ; As I walk'd forth one summer's day ; A beggar got a beadle ; All you that lov'd our queen alive ; As I sat at my spinning-wheel ; A beggar, a beggar, a beggar I'll be ; As sad Amyntor in a meadow lay ; As I walk'd in the woods one ev'ning ; Adieu to the pleasures and follies ; A pox of the fooling and plotting ; A curse on all cares ; A pox of dull mortals of the grave ; As May in all her youthful dress ; A gentle breeze from the Lavinian sea ; A soldier and a sailor, a tinker ; Ah Jenny gin your eyes do kill ; At London che've bin ; All hands up aloft ; As I went o'er yon misty moor -- Beneath a mirtle shade."@en ;
   schema:description "Blush not redder than the morning ; Banish my Lydia these ; Beauty, like kingdoms not for one ; Beneath a cool shade Amaryllis ; Boasting fops who court the fair ; Come here's a good health ; Cupid make your virgins tender ; Corinna I excuse thy face ; Chloe found love for his Psyche ; Coy Belinda may discover ; Corinna 'tis you that I love ; Come buy my greens and flowers ; Caelia's bright beauty all others transcend ; Come from the temple, away to the bed ; Come all that are dispos'd ; Chloris, can you ; Caelia be not too complying ; Clasp'd in my dear Melinda's arms ; Come Caelia come, let's sit ; Ere Phillis with her looks did kill -- Fly, fly ye lazy hours."@en ;
   schema:description "Stand clear, my masters ; Sometimes I am a tapster new ; When apparell'd neat and fine ; Say cruel Amoret, how long ; Such command o'er my fate ; Sit you merry gallants ; Since Phillis swears inconstancy ; Some in the town go betimes ; Suppose a man does all he can ; Sors sine visu ; See bleeding at your feet ; Since Tom's in the chair, and every one here ; Such a happy, happy life ; To meet her Mars the queen of love ; Thus Damon knock'd at Caelia's door ; The world is a bubble ; Through the cold shady woods ; The Gordian knot ; There dwelt a widow in this town ; There was an old man ; There is a thing which in the light ; There's not a swain ; Tormenting beauty leave my breast ; Tell me why so long ; 'Tis a foolish mistake ; Tell me, tell me, charming ; Tho' thou'rt ugly and old ; Tho' you make no return ; The king is gone to Oxon Town ; Tho' I love and she knows it ; There was three travellers ; Troy had a breed of brave ; There's none so pretty ; The ordinance a-board ; That scornful Sylvia's chains ; Tom Tinker's my true love ; To you fair ladies now at land ; Then come kind Damon come ; The night is come that will ; There's a new set of rakes ; Tho' begging is an honest trade ; The rosey morn lukes blith and gay ; The restauration now's the word -- Underneath the castle wall."@en ;
   schema:description "God prosper long our noble king ; Go tell Amyntor gentle swain ; Happy the time when free ; Happy is the country life ; Here's a health to those men ; If any one long for a musical song ; I am a lover, and 'tis true ; I have been east, and I have ; I find I am a cuckold, I care ; If every woman was serv'd in ; I prithee sweet-heart grant me ; In summer time when flowers ; It is my delight both night and ; In fifty-five, may I never thrive ; If't please you for to hear ; In our country, and in your country ; Instead of our buildings and castles ; I'll sing you a song ; I a tender young maid have been ; In the world can ever a trade ; In the gardiners paradise sweetly ; In the shade upon the grass ; In courts, ambition kills the great ; In Paul's church-yard in London ; I never saw a face till now ; In vain she frowns, in vain ; In the long vocation ; Jenny long resisted Wully's fierce desire ; Joan to the May-pole away let's run ; Jockey late with jenny walking ; Jogging on from yonder green -- Kate, the loveliest thing."@en ;
   schema:description "By moon-light on the green ; Bonny Peggy Ramsey that any ; By shady woods and purling ; Belinda! why do you distrust ; Born to surprize the world ; Bring out your coney-skins ; Bonny Scottish lads that keens ; Come bring us wine in plenty ; Come pretty birds present your ; Come fill up the bowl ; Cease lovely Strephon, cease to ; Cease whining Damon to complain ; Caelia my heart has often rang'd ; Corinna, if my fate's to love you ; Caelia's charms are past expressing ; Come beaus, virtuosos, rich heirs ; Cease, cease of Cupid to complain ; Come, come ye nymphs ; Chloe blushed, and frown'd and swore ; Caelia hence with affectation -- Did you not hear of a gallant."@en ;
   schema:description "Let's be jolly, fill our glasses ; Let's sing of stage-coaches ; Last Christmas 'twas my chance ; Lately as thorough the fair ; Let soldiers fight for pay and praise ; Long had Damon been admir'd ; Laurinda, who did love disdain ; Let ambition fire thy mind ; Long was the day e'er Alexis ; Let's be merry, blith and jolly ; My friend, if you would understand ; Marriage it seems is for better ; No more let Damon's eyes pursue ; Nay pish, nay pish, nay pish sir ; No, no every morning my ; Now my freedom's regain'd ; No, Phillis, tho' you've all the charms ; Now to you te dry wooers -- Once more to these arms my."@en ;
   schema:description "Lay that sullen garland by thee ; Leave off fond hermite, leave thy vow ; Like a ring without a finger ; Lament, lament you scholars all ; Love thee! good sooth, not I ; Let us drink and be merry ; Let's love, and let's laugh ; Let the daring advent'rers be toss'd ; Let's consecrate a mighty bowl ; My masters and friends ; Methinks the poor town has been ; My life and my death, are both ; Man (Man, man) is for the woman ; Now that love's holiday is come ; Now listen a while, and I ; Now God above that made all things ; Old stories tell how Hercules ; Of all the trades that ever I see ; Of all the recreations ; O the time that is past ; Oh Mother, Roger with his kisses ; Oh fie! what mean I foolish maid ; Ods hartly wounds, Ize not to plowing ; O raree show, o brave show -- Phillis at first seem'd much afraid."@en ;
   schema:description "Under this stone lies one ; Upon the wings of love ; When rich men die, whose purses ; Will you please to give ear a while ; When Ize came first to London Town ; What tho' I am a country lass ; Was ever a man so vext with ; What creature's that with his ; While the citizens prate ; Women are wanton, yet cunningly ; What if Betty grows old ; What's a cuckold, learn of me ; When Sawney first did wooe me ; What need we take care for ; Well I'll say that for Sir William ; What shall I do to shew how ; Why does the morn in blushes rise ; When Aurelia first I courted ; Whilst Europe is alarmed with ; When Troy Town for ten years wars ; Why should we boast of Lais ; When Cupid from his mother fled ; When I see my Strephon languish ; You courtiers scorn we country ; You maidens and wives ; Young Phaon strove the bliss to taste -- v. 5. All Christians and lay-elders too."@en ;
   schema:description "Believe me Jenny, for I tell ; Bonny lad, prithee lay thy pipe down ; Bonny lads and damsels ; Bonny lass gin thou wert mine ; Come buy my new ballad ; Come listen a while tho' the weather ; Chloris now thou art fled away ; Calm was the ev'ning, and clear ; Come sweet lass, this bonny weather ; Come if you dare, our trumpets sound ; Damon why will you die for love ; From France, from Spain, from Rome ; Forth from the dark and dismal cell ; Four and twenty fidlers all in a row ; From twelve years old, I oft have ; Frier Bacon walks again ; Fairest work of happy nature ; Fairest Jenny! thou mun love me -- Great Alexander's horse."@en ;
   schema:description "Fye Amaryllis, cease to grieve ; Fairest isle, all isles excelling ; Fye Jockey, never prattle ; Forgive me Chloe if I dare ; Fortune is blind and beauty unkind ; From Father Hopkins ; Fickle bliss, fantastick treasure ; Fill the glass fill, fill ; Farewel my useless scrip ; Fates I defie, I defie your advances ; Farewel Chloe, o farewel ; God prosper long our gracious queen ; Go, go, go, go falsest of thy sex ; Good morrow Gossip Joan ; How long, how long shall I pine ; Hang this whining way of wooing ; Here's the summer sprightly, gay ; How happy's the husband ; Having spent all my coin ; How happy, how happy is she ; Hang the presbyters Gill ; Honest shepherd, since ; How happy's that husband who after ; How is the world transform'd ; Hub ub, ub, boo ; Had I but love ; How happy we are ; Hear Chloe hear ; How happy's he who weds a wife ; How charming Phillis is, how fair -- If I hear Orinda swear."@en ;
   schema:description "Divine Astrea hither flew ; Draw Cupid draw, and make ; Damon if you will believe me ; Drunk I was last night ; Delia tir'd Strephon with her ; Fair Caelia too fondly contemns ; Fly Damon fly, 'tis death to stay ; Fear not mortal, none shall harm ; Farewel ungrateful traytor ; Gilderoy was a bonny boy ; Good neighbor why do you ; How now Sister Betteris, why look ; Heaven first created woman to ; Hears not my Phillis how ; How happy's the mortal whose ; He himself courts his own ruin ; How happy and free is the ; How charming Phillis is ; Hither turn thee, hither turn thee ; Here lies William de Valence ; Ho my dear joy, now what dost ; Here's a health to the tackers ; Here are people and sports ; Hark! now the drums beat up again ; How often have I curs'd that sable deceit -- I am a young lass of Lynn."@en ;
   schema:description "Oh the miller, the dusty ; Oh, oh lead me, lead me to some ; O love is longer than the way ; One evening a little before it was dark ; On Enfield Common, I met a woman ; One Sunday after mass, Dormet ; Oh! happy, happy groves ; On Brandon Heath, in sight of ; Prey lend me your ear if you've ; Pan leave piping, the gods have ; Prithee friend leave off thy thinking ; Pillycock came to my lady's toe ; Poor Cleonice thy garlands tear ; Some Christian people all give ear ; Since pop'ry of late is so much ; Some years of late, in eighty eight ; Shall I wasting in despair ; Some wives are good, and some ; Still I'm wishing, still desiring ; Smiling Phillis has an air ; Spare might love, oh spare -- Tho' it may seem rude."@en ;
   schema:description "Poor Caelia once was very fair ; Pastora's beauties when unblown ; Pretty Armida will be kind ; Quoth John to Joan, wilt thou ; Ranging the plain one summers ; Since love hath in thine ; Since roving of late ; Some men they do delight in hounds ; Sabina in the dead of night ; Sawney is a bonny, bonny lad ; Since there's so small difference ; Sir Eglamore, that valiant knight ; Sing, sing, whilst we trip it -- There's many clinching verse is made ; The sleeping Thames one morn ; The four and twentieth day of May ; Tom and Will were shepherds swains ; Tho' Sylvia's eyes a flame could raise ; Thus all our lives long we're frolick ; Take not a woman's anger ill ; The bonny grey ey'd morn began ; The sun was just setting, the reaping ; Tho' jockey su'd me long, he met ; Tell me Jenny, tell my roundly ; The bright Laurinda, whose hard fate ; There was a jovial beggar ; Tell me no more, no more, I am deceiv'd ; The beauteous nymph look from above ; There was a bonny blade ; Tobacco is but an Indian weed ; The danger is over, the battle ; To kiss, to kiss is pretty, 'tis pretty -- Undone! undone! the lawyers are."@en ;
   schema:description "No, no, poor suffering heart ; New pyramid's raise ; Never sigh but think of kissing ; Now, now, the queen's health ; Noble King Lud ; Now I'm resolv'd to love no more ; Not your eyes Melania move me ; Now, now the night's come ; Now Jockey and Moggy are ready ; Oh! my panting heart ; Over the mountains ; Oh how happy's he, who from ; Oh! the mighty pow'r of love ; Oh the charming month of May ; Oh Roger I've been to see Eugene ; Of all the handsome ladies ; Phillis lay aside your thinking ; Pish fye, you're rude Sir ; Phillis, I can ne'er forgive it ; Poor Sawney had marry'd a wife ; Room for gentlemen ; Retire old miser ; Richest gift of lavish nature -- She met with a country-man."@en ;
   schema:description "Just coming from sea ; If ever you mean to be kind ; I know her false ; I am come to lock all fast ; In vain Clemene you bestow ; If wine be a cordial ; I fain wou'd find a passing ; If I should go seek ; I seek no more to shady coverts ; I try'd in parks and plays ; In a flowry myrtle grove ; I am a jolly toper ; I'll tell you all, both great ; I am a cunning constable ; I courted and writ ; I'll tell thee Dick where I have ; I am a poor shepherd undone ; I love to madness, rave t' enjoy ; I'll press, I'll bless thee charming ; I'm vext to think that Damon ; I have a tenement to let -- Ken you, who comes here."@en ;
   schema:description "One night in my ramble I ; Oh! let no eyes be dry ; Old Lewis le Grand, he raves like ; Of old soldiers, the song you ; Of late in the park a fair fancy ; Oh! how you protest and solemnly ; Philander and Sylvia, a gentle ; Poor Jenny and I we toiled ; Pretty Floramel, no tongue can ; Plague us not with idle stories ; Poor Mountfort is gone ; Pretty parrot say, when I was ; State and ambition, all joy to ; Stay, stay, shut the gates ; Slaves to London I'll deceive you ; Stay, ah stay, ah turn, ah whither ; See how fair and fine she lies ; Since Caelia only has the art ; Some brag of their Chloris ; See, sirs, see here! a doctor rare ; Swain thy hopeless passion smother -- There was an old woman liv'd."@en ;
   schema:description "As I went by an hospital ; A shepherd kept sheep on a ; As I was walking under a grove ; A councel grave our king did hold ; A heroe of no small renown ; As the fryer he went along ; A bonny lad came to the court ; A pox on those fools, who exclaim ; Amongst the pure ones all ; As Oyster Nan stood by her tub ; Ah! Caelia how can you be ; Are you grown so melancholy ; As Collin went from his sheep ; A wife I do hate ; A thousand several ways I try'd ; A Whig that's full ; As Cupid roguishly one day ; A young man sick and like to die ; At noon in a sultry summer's day ; Ah! how lovely sweet and dear ; Advance, advance, advance gay ; Ah! foolish lass, what mun I do -- Bold impudent Fuller invented."@en ;
   schema:description "I am a jovial cobler bold ; It was a rich merchant man ; If sorrow the tyrant invade ; In the pleasant month of May ; It was a happy golden day ; I prithee send me back my heart ; In Chloris all soft charms agree ; I lik'd, but never lov'd before ; Iris beware when Strephon pursues ; I am one in whom nature has ; In vain, in vain, the God I ask ; In the devil's country there ; In elder time, there was of yore ; Ianthia the lovely, the joy ; I met with the devil ; Jilting is in such a fashion ; Jockey loves his Moggy dearly ; Jockey met with Jenny fair -- Let the females attend."@en ;
   schema:description "Let not love, let not love on me ; Liberia's all my thought ; Let Mary live long ; Lerinda complaineth that ; Lay by your pleading ; Love's pow'r in my heart ; Let's wet the whistle ; Let's sing as one may say ; Lucinda has the de'el and all ; Love is a bauble ; Lais when you ; Lorenzo you amuse the town ; Love's passion never knew ; Let those youths who freedom ; Lavia would, but dare not venture ; Love, the sweets of love ; Marlborough's a brave commander ; My dear Corinna give me leave ; May her blest example chace ; My dear and only love ; My nose is the largest of all ; My nose is the flattest of all ; Mortals learn your lives ; Mirtillo, whilst you patch ; My friend thy beauty ; Must love, that tyrant ; My Theodora can those eyes -- Now dry up thy tears."@en ;
   schema:description "As unconcern'd and free as air ; As I am a sailor ; And now, now the duke's march ; Aurelia now one moment lost ; After the pangs of fierce desire ; A pox on the fool ; A young man lately in our town ; All joy to mortals ; A pox on the times ; A pox on such fools ; As Cupid many ages past ; All Christians that have ears to hear ; As at noon Dulcina rested ; A dean and prebendary ; A world that's full of fools and mad-men ; Astutus constabularius ; Amor est pegma ; Abroad as I was walking ; A pedlar proud as I heard tell ; A young man and a maid ; All own the young Sylvia is ; A swain in despair ; As I came down the hey land town ; A jolly young grocer of London Town ; As it befel upon one time ; A taylor good Lord, in the time of vacation ; A comely dame of Islington ; Ah! how happy's he ; A little love may prove a pleasure ; At the change as I was walking ; All you that must take a leap in the dark ; Alphonzo, if you Sir ; A worthy London prentice ; At the break of morning light -- Belinda's pretty, pretty pleasing form."@en ;
   schema:description "There was an old woman ; To hunt the fox is an old sport ; There was a maid the other day ; Tho' bootless I must needs complain ; They say the world is full of pelf ; There was a lady in the north ; There was a lass in Cumberland ; The wit hath long beholding been ; The beard thick or thin ; This is a structure fair ; There were too bumpkins lov'd ; To charming Caelia's arms I flew ; There was a man, a shentleman ; To find my Tom of Bedlam ; The devil he was so weather beat ; The weather's too bleak now ; These London wenches are so stout ; There lately was a maiden fair ; There is one black and sullen ; Three merry lads met at the Rose ; The fire of love in youthful blood ; Tho' the pride of my passion fair ; Thursday in the morn ; The mighty state of cuckoldom ; Take not the first refusal ill -- Upon a time I chanced to walk."@en ;
   schema:editor <http://viaf.org/viaf/5060938> ; # Thomas D'Urfey
   schema:editor <http://viaf.org/viaf/42680649> ; # Henry Playford
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   schema:name "Wit and mirth: or, Pills to purge melancholy"@en ;
   schema:productID "1192676" ;
   schema:publication <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1192676#PublicationEvent/new_york_folklore_library_publishers_1959> ;
   schema:publisher <http://experiment.worldcat.org/entity/work/data/27074563#Agent/folklore_library_publishers> ; # Folklore Library Publishers
   wdrs:describedby <http://www.worldcat.org/title/-/oclc/1192676> ;
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