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The withering away of the totalitarian state-- and other surprises

Author: Jeane J Kirkpatrick
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : AEI Press ; Lanham, Md. : Distributed by National Book Network, 1990.
Series: AEI studies, 498.
Edition/Format:   Book : EnglishView all editions and formats
Database:WorldCat
Summary:
In these fascinating critiques on the dramatic developments set in motion by the perestroika revolution, the author analyzes the attempts to transform Soviet-style communism from within and their momentous consequences throughout the world. With her realistic understanding of Communist ideology and her broad personal experience with foreign leaders and foreign policy, the author offers unique insights into the  Read more...
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Additional Physical Format: Online version:
Kirkpatrick, Jeane J.
Withering away of the totalitarian state-- and other surprises.
Washington, D.C. : AEI Press ; Lanham, Md. : Distributed by National Book Network, 1990
(OCoLC)607772989
Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Jeane J Kirkpatrick
ISBN: 0844737275 9780844737270
OCLC Number: 22665512
Notes: Includes index.
Description: xi, 317 pages ; 24 cm.
Contents: pt. I, The Perestroika Revolution: --
Sakharov and Gorbachev: a challenge --
New men in the Kremlin --
New thinking in the Kremlin --
Is he a new kind of communist? --
Four questions about Gorbachev's reforms --
Communist contradictions --
Crisis of communism --
Rectifying history: then and now --
Rectifying history: the uses of the past --
The new styles of the new Bolsheviks --
Moscow's anti-American reformer --
Gorbachev's tricky task in Eastern Europe --
The limits of pluralism under Perestroika --
Relaxing the totalitarian grip --
Let them eat cake --
Transforming Soviet communism from within --
Sakharov's fear of benevolent despotism --
Human rights: the essential element --
The logic of freedom --
Gorbachev vs. Lenin --
Is the Brezhnev doctrine dead? --
Can communism transform itself? --
Messages to China, from Hungary --
Gorbachev's double binds --
Bad bargain in Poland --
The new November revolution --
The end of totalitarianism in Europe --
Enough to break an old Bolshevik's heart --
If they ousted Gorbachev I --
If they ousted Gorbachev II --
Bad news? what's bad about it? --
Decolonization: opting out --
The costs of empire --
Does action against Iraq herald a new age for the United Nations? pt. II, Summitry: men and arms: --
Getting acquainted --
Who knows what Gorbachev wants? --
Russia power --
High hopes and hard experiences: SALT II --
Soviet provocations --
Gorbachev at Reykjavik: the high roller in the haunted house --
Unseemly seductions I --
Unseemly seductions II --
An arms deal we should refuse --
This treaty won't change the world --
Deal making Soviet style --
And now, 'proximity talks' --
Legalism, again: the American approach to foreign affairs --
Malta can't be Yalta. pt. III, The United States and its allies: --
Turning tables on allies --
Spooking the allies at Reykjavik --
Treaty and consequences --
Limited partners in Europe --
Limited partners in Asia --
End of an era? --
Europe's drift away from the United States --
More alliance problems --
Gorbachev and the Germanys --
The transformation of Europe --
A united Germany? --
Worrying about Germany --
Gorbachev and Kohl: mutual aid --
A safer world? pt. IV, The last colonial era: --
Afghanistan --
Soviet logic on Afghanistan --
New thinking on Afghanistan --
Afghanistan: filling in the blanks --
The real reason the Soviets left Afghanistan --
Angola --
Support the Contras in Angola --
Beyond profit in Angola --
Slandering Savimbi --
Still Moscow's satellites --
Nicaragua --
New thinking on Nicaragua --
Many threats, little bread --
Nicaragua and Libya --
Promises, promises I --
Promises, promises II --
Can we now trust the Sandinistas? --
Much bravery seen during visit to Nicaragua --
Is the Nicaragua government ready to comply with the Esquipulas Agreement? --
Moment of truth for Central America --
The prisoners of Nicaragua --
Their style of democracy --
Nicaragua's flawed election law --
Nicaragua's flawed election process --
Election surprise --
Democracy at last --
El Salvador --
The suffering of a father/president --
Duarte's departure --
The Marxists' game in El Salvador --
A trap in El Salvador --
El Salvador: the election was fair --
Cuba --
Our Cuban misadventures: half measures, half deals --
While 'pawns' rot in Cuban jails --
A Cuban hero --
Castro's nightmare --
Cuba, the United Nations, and the vanishing 'Socialistic Bloc' --
Castro's last cheerleaders --
Totalitarianism and terror --
Ideological crimes and the Beijing spring --
Realism and Chinese repression. pt. V, Reflections of the new Soviet revolution: --
Reflections on the new Soviet revolution.
Series Title: AEI studies, 498.
Responsibility: Jeane J. Kirkpatrick.

Abstract:

In these fascinating critiques on the dramatic developments set in motion by the perestroika revolution, the author analyzes the attempts to transform Soviet-style communism from within and their momentous consequences throughout the world. With her realistic understanding of Communist ideology and her broad personal experience with foreign leaders and foreign policy, the author offers unique insights into the impact of change not only in the USSR but also in Germany, Poland, and Hungary, as well as Nicaragua, Cuba, Angola, and other third world nations. Regional conflicts, summitry and arms control, and relations with between the United States and its allies are among the many topics discussed in this volume. -- from Back Cover.

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schema:description"pt. IV, The last colonial era: -- Afghanistan -- Soviet logic on Afghanistan -- New thinking on Afghanistan -- Afghanistan: filling in the blanks -- The real reason the Soviets left Afghanistan -- Angola -- Support the Contras in Angola -- Beyond profit in Angola -- Slandering Savimbi -- Still Moscow's satellites -- Nicaragua -- New thinking on Nicaragua -- Many threats, little bread -- Nicaragua and Libya -- Promises, promises I -- Promises, promises II -- Can we now trust the Sandinistas? -- Much bravery seen during visit to Nicaragua -- Is the Nicaragua government ready to comply with the Esquipulas Agreement? -- Moment of truth for Central America -- The prisoners of Nicaragua -- Their style of democracy -- Nicaragua's flawed election law -- Nicaragua's flawed election process -- Election surprise -- Democracy at last -- El Salvador -- The suffering of a father/president -- Duarte's departure -- The Marxists' game in El Salvador -- A trap in El Salvador -- El Salvador: the election was fair -- Cuba -- Our Cuban misadventures: half measures, half deals -- While 'pawns' rot in Cuban jails -- A Cuban hero -- Castro's nightmare -- Cuba, the United Nations, and the vanishing 'Socialistic Bloc' -- Castro's last cheerleaders -- Totalitarianism and terror -- Ideological crimes and the Beijing spring -- Realism and Chinese repression."@en
schema:description"pt. II, Summitry: men and arms: -- Getting acquainted -- Who knows what Gorbachev wants? -- Russia power -- High hopes and hard experiences: SALT II -- Soviet provocations -- Gorbachev at Reykjavik: the high roller in the haunted house -- Unseemly seductions I -- Unseemly seductions II -- An arms deal we should refuse -- This treaty won't change the world -- Deal making Soviet style -- And now, 'proximity talks' -- Legalism, again: the American approach to foreign affairs -- Malta can't be Yalta."@en
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